Educators Rising California Will Elect Student Leaders in October

Educators Rising California is electing its first-ever group of Student Officers to serve on its Executive Council next month.

Educators Rising CA is dedicated to attracting promising students to pursue education-related careers and to helping them develop the skills and strong leadership traits that are found in high-quality educators. The organization also provides students with valuable leadership opportunities, including the newly announced State Officer positions.

Students elected to the Executive Council will serve as ambassadors for the organization and will have multiple opportunities to engage in activities to build their own leadership skills. All eligible students are encouraging to apply for candidacy as Educators Rising CA State Officer! (See Article VII, Section 1 in the application for eligibility.)

Effective state officers are articulate, self-motivated, outgoing, conscientious students with a passion for Educators Rising CA’s mission and vision. They will be key to promoting the organization as essential to the cultivation of tomorrow’s great educators. Officers must be comfortable with public speaking and connecting with education stakeholders (students, teachers, administrators, policymakers, etc.) both virtually and in person.

Educators Rising CA is looking for the following Student Officers:

  • President
  • Vice-President
  • Secretary
  • Southern Region Representative
  • Central Region Representative
  • Northern Region Representative

The deadline to apply for one of the positions is October 20, 2017. Applications include a written form, resume, two letters of recommendation and a two-minute video. Elections will be held October 27-30th, and the new State Officers will be announced on Tuesday, October 31st.

Learn more about Educators Rising CA and the new Student Officer positions, and download the application today: http://www.tomorrow.org/educatorsrising/officers.html

 

A Day in the Life of Today’s Students

As we see more and more technology in our schools, we wanted to take a look at how emerging technologies support learning on a daily basis – in and out of school. At this year’s Speak Up Congressional Briefing, we shared data on what “a day in the life” of a middle school student looks like today.

More than 138,000 students in grades 6 to 8 participated in Speak Up 2016. Here is some of what they told us about their technology use in school.

Technology use in schools data findings

The middle school students we profiled this year told us that technology allows them to learn at their own pace in ways that fit their individual styles, and that they are taking greater ownership of their own learning.

Technology use in schools data findings

That’s all just within the school day. We know, however, that students see learning as a 24/7 enterprise. So, we asked them how and where they are using technology to learn outside the classroom.

Tech and learning - outside of school

Tech and learning - outside of school

 

Find more Speak Up 2016 data findings on tomorrow.org, including:

Designing a Dream School

Guest post by: Dr. R. Mark Beadle

Milton Hershey School

As I thought about this title, I remembered a story you have likely heard:

Early one morning, a mother went in to wake up her son.

Wake up son, it’s time to go to school!

But why, Mom? I don’t want to go.

Give me two reasons why you don’t want to go.

Well, the kids hate me for one,  and the teachers hate me, too!

Oh, that’s no reason not to go to school.  Come on now and get ready.

Give me two reasons why I should go to school.

Well, for one, you’re 52 years old.  And for another, you’re the Principal! Source

Maybe if we had dream schools, principals, teachers and even students would feel excited about coming to school. I feel blessed to have helped dream and deliver a dream school—one traditional and one online.

As part of Speak Up 2016, Project Tomorrow surveyed more than 5 million students, educators and parents about key trends and research in science, math, technology, and the future of education. They asked these stakeholders about their dream school. These are the responses from school administrators and high school students (sortable):

ResponseAdministrators*Students**
Augmented reality apps12%26%
Chromebook or laptop for every student to use at school77%67%
Cloud based communications and collaboration tools (e.g. Google Apps for Education, Microsoft Office 365)65%51%
Admins: Dashboard or portal to track student academic progress over time (e.g. classes taken, course grades, test scores, absences) even if students change schools. Students: Online site that tracks all of my school year information including grades, test scores and activities from kindergarten through high school even if I go to different schools61%59%
Digital content (animations, simulations, online articles and resources)51%46%
Google hangouts or other online group messaging in class32%48%
Interactive whiteboards52%50%
Internet access anywhere at school69%70%
Learning management systems (e.g. Blackboard)40%33%
Mobile apps for learning39%54%
Online or virtual classes35%41%
Online tests and assessments61%52%
Online textbooks58%53%
Online tools that help organize schoolwork and provide access to important information50%49%
Online tutors50%45%
Online, video and digital games31%50%
Online videos and movies31%51%
Social media tools for students to connect and work with others (e.g. blogs, wikis, social networking sites)31%44%
Tablet for every student to use at school43%42%
Tools to help students create media projects (e.g. video, audio)54%48%
Virtual reality experiences and hardware (headsets and devices)29%33%

Laptops and Internet access share the top two spots in both the student and the school leaders’ dream schools. Tablets are low on the list for the high school students surveyed. Half (49 percent) of the students report using a school owned device. Three-quarters (76 percent) report having their own laptop to use and 44 percent report having a tablet. It would seem that most students surveyed have their own device and do not need a school provided one. Only 4 percent report not having internet at home. So, another conclusion is that the top two items in a dream school are already happening for most students—laptops and Internet access. (Whether or not that access in school is fast enough and universal is another question.)

Some differences between what school leaders would have in a dream school and what students would have should be noted. School leaders ranked digital content, online tutors, tablets, media creation tools, and learning management systems much higher than students in their dream schools.  Students ranked mobile apps, online videos, and digital games much higher in their dream school than did school leaders.

This list of 20+ digital tools and strategies leaves no doubt that the dream school would be technology rich. It also shows the challenge of resourcing a school and training teachers to effectively use the variety of tools already available. It raises the question: Is it possible to keep up? Certainly, keeping up and delivering a dream school will require a reallocation of resources—both money and time.

Forty-one percent of the students said online classes would be part of their dream school (35 percent of school leaders said so). Yet only 3 percent report taking mainly online classes this year. This seems to be an area where schools could close the gap between reality and what is desired. They could deliver more choice and more personalization at a lower cost if they made a digital shift. More than a third (36 percent) of school leaders report already offering online classes and 57 percent report they have no plans to offer them (note: two-thirds of the leaders were not in high schools).

Students reported classes in these subjects as the most desirable for online learning: Computer Science, World Languages, the Arts, Psychology, and college or study skills. These subjects were reported to be most often already taken as an online class: English, Math, and Health. Sevenstar has partner schools offering their Health class online in the summer so students can take more rigorous classes or more fine arts classes in the regular school year.We find that the use cases for online learning are most often due to credit recovery needs or scheduling conflicts. Online classes are typically only utilized when it’s inconvenient to offer a credit in the classroom. Is this a lack of vision for the use of online learning by school leaders to enrich the learning opportunities for students?

The amount of data contained in the Project Tomorrow results provides a wealth of material to guide our decisions as school leaders.

 

The author: Dr. R. Mark Beadle was a Principal for over 20 years before helping to start Sevenstar, an online Christian school that has served over 40,000 students.  He thinks that being an educator today must be one of the best times ever to be involved in helping students. The future is bright with opportunity to make a difference. You can connect with him on Linked In or write mark@sevenstar.org.

*The specific question for school leaders was: “Imagine you are designing a dream school for today’s students. Which of these tools or strategies do you think holds the greatest potential for increasing student achievement and success? (Check all that apply)  More than 2,000 leaders replied, and about 1/3 were at the high school level.

** The specific question for students was: Imagine you are designing your dream school. Which of these tools would have the greatest positive impact on your learning? (Check all that apply) The students were all in high school for the results above and numbered 109,030.

The picture at the top of the article is of a building at the Milton Hershey School (PA).

Allowing the Community to Speak Up to Effect Change (Guest Post)

Guest Post by Tim Smith, Supervisor of Instructional Practice & Technology Integration, Red Lion Area School District (PA). Tim will be sharing steps taken to implement the survey, design the process of change, and future plans and next steps on Wednesday at ISTE 2017.

Every team, at some point, draws a line in the sand. Some even draw that line in concrete. It represents a point at which they’ve had enough of the current or past and are moving forward. That’s tough. For so many, the comfort zone is just that, comfortable. Do the same thing, year in and year out, because that’s what they know. To change requires a physical and intellectual investment of time and resources. It also requires knowledge. Teams have to know what they want to accomplish and how those around them feel about where the organization is and where they want to go.

In the fall of 2016, at the Red Lion Area School District we used the Speak Up survey by Project Tomorrow to empower the students, parents, & community to have a voice and impact the direction of the District. The survey results clearly indicated a need and desire to move to a District-wide blended learning environment.


You see, 81% of our community said they wanted something other than a “traditional classroom,” yet 79% of our teachers provided this type of environment. Is there a disconnect?

And what about our students…?

…it was clear to our team that something needed to change.

What if we did nothing to change the way that we meet the needs of our students?

Without the use of the Speak Up survey, we wouldn’t have seen our needs so clearly. We’ve now embarked on a journey of Digital Conversion in the Red Lion Area School District that will ensure that students will have access to the tools and classroom environments.

At times this has been a challenging process. We have made a few messes, and refocused our efforts. We are truly excited about the the next several months of growth…

Come learn more about our journey and the future by joining me from 9:00 – 9:45 am on June 28 for How the Learning Community Can Speak Up to Create Change at ISTE 2017 during the Leadership Playground.

Original post on Tim Smith’s blog.

2017 Educators Rising California Conferences

We are excited to announce that this year’s conference season was a great success. With a total of over 700+ student attendees, and over 35 workshops offered. This year’s conference data indicates that our conferences bring STEM knowledge, career inspiration and pathway information to attendees.

Each conference was a full-day interactive event for students who are interested in careers in education. The day included an opening Keynote or panel, breakout sessions, college fair and more!

Here are some conference highlights!

San Diego Region Conference

With 250 students in attendance, the first San Diego Region Conference was held at San Diego State University in San Diego, California on February 3rd.

  • Keynote Speaker: David J. Johnson
  • Workshops included:
    • Benefits of Project Based Learning
    • Special Education: A Career Beyond Paperwork
    • Teacher Talk Teaching Panel
    • School Counseling-The Next Generation
    • Building Community: Beyond the Four Walls of Classrooms
  • Colleges and Universities included:
    • University of California, San Diego
    • Azusa Pacific University
    • San Diego City College
    • National University
    • California State University, San Marcos
      and many more…

“The conference was very interesting and informative, as well as interactive. Overall, today was a great experience for me.” -Student

Learn more about the San Diego conference here. Continue reading

Speak Up 7 for 2017: Top digital learning trends in K-12 schools today

Each year, the Speak Up Research Project for Digital Learning polls K-12 students, parents, and educators about the role of technology for learning in and out of school. This survey represents the largest collection of authentic, unfiltered stakeholder voices on digital learning. Since fall 2003, more than 5 million K-12 students, parents, teachers, librarians, principals, technology leaders, district administrators, communications officers, and members of the community have shared their views and ideas through Speak Up.

Following are seven trends we are watching based on the more than 514,000 Speak Up surveys submitted from educators, students and parents from October 2016 to January 2017.

1. Funding, the achievement gap and staff morale top the list of superintendents’ concerns.

Over the last six years, the same six issues have topped this list of “what wakes superintendents up at night,” but the levels of concern have intensified.

In 2010, Superintendents said:In 2016, Superintendents said:
Funding (51%)Funding (64%)
Test scores (44%)Achievement gap (48%)
Achievement gap (39%)Staff morale (43%)
Staff morale (39%)College and career skills (38%)
College and career skills (20%)Teacher recruitment (38%)
Teacher recruitment (16%)Test scores (35%)

Continue reading

Students Take Charge of Learning, Empowered by Technology

Aided by technology, students across the country are self-directing their own learning, no longer waiting for teachers or schools to catch up. More than 400,000 K-12 students shared how and when they learn via the Speak Up 2016 Research Project for Digital Learning.

In our latest Speak Up data release, Ten Things Everyone Should Know about K-12 Students’ Digital Learning, 2017, Project Tomorrow details some of the findings from the student responses:

  • Access to mobile devices in and out of school continues to grow. Over just a two-year period, twice as many students are now using Chromebooks in school (2014 to 2016).
  • Students are using mobile devices to self-direct learning by:
    • doing research on the Internet (84%)
    • looking up class information (59%)
    • creating documents to share (54%)
    • emailing teachers with questions (47%)
    • setting up reminders about class due dates (43%)
    • taking notes (40%)
  • Students are exploring online learning. More than one-third of middle school students say they have already taken an online class in Math, Science and English. The subjects that top their wish list for online classes include: college prep/study skills (58%), art appreciation (58%), world languages (56%), career technical/vocational education (51%) and computer science (47%).
  • More than 1/3 of students say they want to learn about future jobs and careers via online tools: online course, digital game, online videos and social media.

“Students have always self-directed some of their own learning, but with the explosion of mobile devices, 24/7 connectivity and digital resources, students are leaving adults behind as they explore subjects that interest them in the ways they learn best,” said Dr. Julie Evans, CEO of Project Tomorrow. “Despite all of the opportunity at their fingertips with the growth in educational technology access in schools, more than half (56%) of students say they use technology more often for learning outside of school than in school.”

Continue reading

Teachers’ Readiness and Willingness to Adopt Digital Tools for Learning

At the ASU GSV Summit this week, we explored the current state of teachers’ readiness and willingness to adopt digital tools for learning with Alan Arkatov from USC Rossier School of Education, Ann Linson from East Noble School Corporation and Jessie Woolley-Wilson from DreamBox Learning.

Everyone see lots of technology in schools these days, but is that technology also changing teaching and learning? The classrooms of today still look a whole lot like the classrooms of yesterday:

Yes, the chalkboard is a white board and paper and pencils have been replaced with laptops, but other than that? Beyond the physical differences we see in classrooms, the other changes we have seen are minimal – despite the opportunities technology presents to transform learning.

While new Speak Up data shows us evidence of external indicators of change, they also indicate the lack of real systematic changes in activities, attitudes or aspirations of teachers. More than 38,000 teachers shared their views as part of the Speak Up 2016 Research Project for Digital Learning from October 2016 to January 2017.

More than two-thirds of teachers report external indicators of change:

  • Using more videos in the classroom
  • Texting with colleagues
  • Relying upon cloud applications more
  • Being in classrooms with student access to devices

But fewer than one-third say they:

  • Use online primary sources within instruction
  • Facilitate a class blog or discussion forum
  • Use an online curriculum with students
  • Create investigations for students w/digital tools
  • Engage in online professional learning communities

Continue reading

Principals Are Looking for Tech Savvy New Teachers

In the midst of our Tomorrow’s Teachers Speak Up research project to learn more about the experiences and aspirations of the next generation of teachers, we took a look at what school administrators told us last fall during Speak Up 2016. A few highlights:

Principals told us they expect new teachers to:

  • Know how to use technology to differentiate instruction (76%)
  • Use technology to communicate with parents and students (73%)
  • Interpret and use data to support student learning and improve teaching practice (71%)
  • Use technology to create authentic learning experiences (65%)
  • Use technology to facilitate student collaboration (63%)

Principals value technology use for teaching and learning:

  • 84% of school leaders say it is important or very important for every student to be able to use a mobile device during the school day to support schoolwork
  • 89% of school leaders say a new teacher candidate’s skills or experiences using technology within teaching is important or very important when evaluating his/her fit or qualifications

Tomorrow’s Teachers Speak Up is open until June 2nd! We want to hear from pre-service teachers about how to leverage technology within learning; how they are being trained; what they expect when they enter the classroom; and more! College students studying to be teachers can take the confidential, 20-minute survey now!

Universities and teacher prep programs who register to participate will learn the results of what their own students had to say this summer (and it’s all free!)