How Schools Evaluate, Use and Pay for Digital Content – Speak Up 2015

In our latest infographic from Speak Up 2015 National Data, we look at some of the questions we asked administrators, teachers and librarians about digital content.

speakup-2015-digital-content-k12-instruction-october-2016We wanted to share a bit more about what administrators told use both about what they look for when evaluating digital content and how they are (and are not) planning to pay for digital content.

While Speak Up participants tell us they value getting their own school/district-level data for free, they also value what they learn just from participating. These two questions offer an example. Administrators may not have considered some of the options available to them, and we are always interested in seeing how responses to these types of questions shift over the years.

Speak Up 2016 is currently open. Students, teachers, parents and administrators across the country are taking time to share their views with us to inform education policy at the national level – and to inform decisions being made locally. Learn more about this free service, and Speak Up before January 27th!

In 2015, we asked school administrators and teachers: “Which of these factors would you consider most important when evaluating the quality of digital content to use within instruction?”

 TeachersSchool Administrators
Adjusts to multiple reading levels74%74%
Compiled on a list by our State Department of Education18%16%
Content was evaluated by a librarian or media specialist19%11%
Content was highly ranked on Google search13%5%
Includes embedded online assessments43%48%
Includes professional development35%60%
Integration into district learning management system or student information system23%30%
Materials are created by practicing teachers56%38%
Mobile app version of the content24%25%
Multiple language versions available26%32%
No commercial advertisements within the content54%47%
Recommended by education membership associations and organizations32%28%
Recommended on education blogs and websites26%18%
Referred by a colleague47%21%
Research-based58%74%
Source is a content expert organization (e.g. National Science Foundation, universities)29%31%
Source is an online curriculum company or organization12%8%
Student achievement with the materials44%46%
Teacher evaluation of the materials45%40%
Teachers can modify it to meet classroom needs71%66%
Textbook publisher recommendations9%3%
User experience25%19%

In 2015, we asked district administrators: “What is the primary way that you are currently funding your purchases, subscriptions, and/or licenses for digital tools, content, and resources to support student learning?”

 Doing thisConsidering thisNo plans
eRate funds71%5%24%
Funding from PTA/parent support groups43%11%46%
Grants or funding from district or school educational foundation67%15%18%
Local bond measures or taxes41%13%46%
Local donations or grants from corporations or foundations43%26%30%
Parents pay an annual technology fee for each child (like a music, athletic, or field trip fee)24%12%63%
Repurposing other budget funds (such as textbook funds)43%31%26%
Savings from allowing students to use their own mobile devices14%23%63%
Savings from moving some services to the cloud31%23%46%
Specific budget allocations from our general funds62%20%18%
State or federal competitive grants47%26%27%
Title 1 funds53%13%33%

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