Category Archives: Speak Up

School Communications Officers: Win $500 Towards Conference of Your Choice!

We want to hear from school communications officers from across the country, so we are offering one more incentive during this last week of Speak Up! Spend 15 minutes taking the special Communications Officer Speak Up survey and be entered for a chance to win a $500 grant towards any 2017 professional conference you choose! The winning school PR pro can attend NSPRA’s 2017 National Seminar or any state NSPRA chapter 2017 conference (or other professional conference) and we’ll contribute $500 toward the registration and/or travel expenses.

School Communications Officer Chance to Win $500Take the Speak Up survey for Communications Officers – share your views, challenges, experience to be part of our national research project – and you will be prompted at the end of the survey to enter for your chance to win a $500 grant towards the 2017 conference of your choice. >>Navigate to the Communications Officers survey by selecting the Educators survey, then the District Administrator, District Tech leader, or Communications Officer survey.<<

This is also your chance to learn more about Speak Up and how you could use our FREE survey tool to learn more from your parents, community, staff and students!

If your schools participated in Speak Up this year, we are also offering one free infographic as well!

Surveys close this Friday, January 27th, so take the survey today! The winner will be announced on February 8th!

Speak Up: Free Tool to Gather LCAP Stakeholder Input

In California, a local control funding formula (LCFF) establishes base, supplemental, and concentration grants for all school districts and charter schools in place of previously existing K–12 funding streams, including revenue limits, general purpose block grants, and most of the 50-plus state categorical programs that existed before 2013. As part of the LCFF, school districts, COEs, and charter schools are required to develop, adopt, and annually update a three-year Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP).

We learned that the Ramona Unified School District has been using Speak Up to help them create and maintain their LCAP. Theresa Grace, Assistant Superintendent, Ramona Unified School District, explained it this way:

“All districts in California are required to write a Local Control Accountability Plan that outlines the district’s goals, actions and services. This plan is the guiding document for how educational funds will be spent in a district. A vital piece in developing a LCAP is stakeholder input. In our district, we use the Speak Up Survey to gather information from our students, teachers, parents and community members that directly influences the goals and actions in our plan. For instance, we are making a concerted effort to engage our students through the use of technology, so we are tracking student Speak Up feedback to see how we are doing. Is the technology working? How are teachers using technology in their instructional practice? Is technology readily available, or is access limited? Speak up data allows us to evaluate how we’re doing over time on these issues and make corrections as needed. It’s a great tool to help our district make funding decisions based on student, teacher, and community needs.”

We hope even more districts across the state of California take advantage of our FREE Speak Up surveys to help inform their LCAPs! Surveys are currently open until January 27, 2017. The next Speak Up surveys will open in October 2017. Feel free to contact us to learn more.

Are you using Speak Up for your LCAP plans or something similar in your state? Let us know

More time to Speak Up! Survey Period Extended to Jan. 27.

We try to be as accommodating as possible to schools and districts around the country who rely on Speak Up to help collect authentic feedback from their students, parents, staff and community members (for free!). We want you to have the time needed to gather as much local data as possible during our annual survey window. We had already extended the deadline into January (for the first time in 14 years) and now we are giving you a couple more weeks!

We heard from so many schools and districts last week asking for just a little more time to be sure they can gather as much data as possible that we’ve again extended the deadline. We even had some brand new districts ask for more time so they can start from scratch (using some of our promo tips & tools)!

You now have until January 27, 2017 to collect surveys

jan27

For those schools and districts who have already completed their efforts to collect data, did you know you can view and use your preliminary data already? Just use this link and follow the directions for your preferred option – you will need to input your state, the first 10 characters of your school or district name, and your administrator password. Your preliminary data results will be updated every Sunday. Final data will be available to all participating schools and districts on February 8th.

Take advantage of the additional time and encourage your community to Speak Up about technology and learning!

School PR Pros: Speak Up Offer

School communications officers: the annual Speak Up surveys close next week! Use the free tool to survey your parents, teachers, community and students. Learn directly from your audiences how they want to receive messages from your district! There is still time to participate, but surveys close January 27, 2017. (Deadline extended!)

We want to hear directly from you as a communications pro, and we’d also like to offer you a free infographic based on your district’s parent and community data. The more parents and community members who take the survey from your district by January 27th, the better data you’ll receive – and we’ll design an infographic for your use showing some of your local findings!

Example findings from Speak Up 2015: Parents Use of Social Media Networks

Example findings from Speak Up 2015: Parents Use of Social Media Networks

Participating districts will receive their data, plus state- and national-level data for FREE in February. Last year, we learned that nationally, more than 50% of parents want text messages from their schools. And, fewer were turning to social media. What would your parents say? Don’t miss this opportunity!

Some of the questions for parents on this year’s surveys (in English and Spanish) include:

  • What do you already know about your local schools? Check the items on this list that you already know about your local schools. (Options include: Qualifications of the teachers in your schools; What schools in your community that have been identified as needing improvement; Trends in student academic performance in your schools over several years; and more)
  • What is the most effective way for your child’s teacher(s) to communicate information to you about your child’s class activities or individualized academic progress? (Options include: Automated phone messages; Meetings; Handwritten notes; Push notifications through mobile app, and more.)
  • What is the most effective way for your child’s school or school district to communicate generalized school or district information and alerts to you? (Options include: Facebook; School portal; YouTube video channel; Text message to my mobile device, Twitter, and more.)

Start the process by taking the survey yourself! Last year was our first year surveying school communications officers and we learned so much, we decided to do it again! We hope you will take the 15-minute, confidential survey today! School communications officers can take the survey via this link. (select the “Educator” survey and then “District Administrator, District Tech leader, or Communications Officer”)

>>You can view some of the 2015 data findings from PR pros in this report we did with Blackboard.

If you’d like to receive the free infographic, please email Lisa Chu with the request.

One Month Remains to Speak Up!

With winter break approaching and the survey period closing on January 13, now is perfect time to make a final push for your school(s) to take the Speak Up survey! We have several promotional materials and tips for you to use:

  • Last minute outreach emails – can also be used for website and social media content
  • Sample tweets – to use before, during and after break
  • Survey lesson plans – great to use as a classroom activity before or after break
  • Focus on parents and community members – this can be some of your most valuable stakeholder data. Be sure to promote the opportunity to Speak Up beyond your campus!
  • Data sneak peeks – share some early national data findings to encourage discussion within your school(s)
  • Speak Up Appreciation week – Our all new weeklong event kicks off on Monday, January 9th where we will be recognizing some of our great Speak Up partners and school districts during the final week of Speak Up. This week will feature our Speak Up Spirit Photo Challenge and another opportunity to win free conference registrations.
  • Start making plans this week for survey participation when everyone returns to school in January – check out our promotional materials, follow our timeline, or pick a day of the week to encourage participation before January 13th! (View intro & tips webinars for insights from other school leaders on implementing and using the surveys.)

You can also view your preliminary data now! We will update your preliminary data every Monday morning before the close of the survey at http://www.speakup4schools.org/speakup2016/find_school.aspx. Finalized data will be released on February 6. View your preliminary data to determine which audiences still need to Speak Up!

Be sure to follow @SpeakUpEd on Twitter for news and updates!

Don’t forget to take the survey yourself!

If you have any questions, please contact us at speakup@tomorrow.org!

2016 Year in Review

At Project Tomorrow, we naturally spend a lot of time thinking about the future as we work to prepare today’s students to be tomorrow’s innovators, leaders and engaged citizens. Still, at this time of year it is a pleasure to look back and reflect on what we have accomplished in 2016. As you will see, it has been an incredible year for Project Tomorrow, and we are very grateful to all of our partners, especially the students, who have contributed to our success.

Here are just a few of our highlights from 2016:

  • Released a new national Speak Up report, “From Print to Pixel: The role of videos, games, animations and simulations within K-12 education,” at a Congressional Briefing in Washington, D.C. in May. The report and briefing detailed findings from more than 500,000 students, educators and parents, from 7,800 schools in 2,660 districts across all 50 states, who took the annual online Speak Up surveys.
  • Expanded our research on technology for learning to international schools around the world with Speak Up International, a collaboration between Project Tomorrow, BrainPop and ISTE.
  • Collaborated with National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) to develop targeted questions for science teachers on the Speak Up survey and disseminate the resulting data to the science education community.
  • Provided more than 70 presentations and webinars on our research, evaluation and programs across 30 states.
  • Surpassed 1,000 members in Educators Rising California, tripling the number of students developing their leadership skills while learning about careers in education since 2015.
    • In June, Educators Rising California member and YouthTEACH2Learn alumnae Karina Janco placed 8th in the nation in the STEM Lesson Planning and Delivery competition at the Educators Rising national conference.
  • Expanded YouthTEACH2Learn by 80 percent, adding new schools offering the program.
  • Received a $100,000 grant from the Silver Giving Foundation and two continuing Career Pathways Trust Grants funded by the California Department of Education enabling us to grow our Tomorrow’s Teachers Initiative through partnerships with colleges across the state.

All of this was made possible thanks to generous contributions from: ABC CLIO, APEX Learning, Blackboard, Cengage, the Carol and James Collins Foundation, CompTIA, Cox Cares, DreamBox, Dwight Stuart Youth Foundation, Edison International, Edwards Lifesciences Foundation, Haskell & White, LLP, Ingram Micro, Intel, Kajeet, Microsemi, Newseum, Orange County Department of Education, One to One Institute, Pacific Life Foundation, Qualcomm, the Roosters Foundation of Orange County, Rosetta Stone, Scholastic, the Silver Giving Foundation, SIATech, and WD Foundation.

We look forward to a wonderful 2017!

 

Sneak Peek at 2016 Speak Up Data!

sneak peek 2016More than 250,000 people have taken a few minutes to share their thoughts with us – and their schools – via this year’s Speak Up surveys. With so much data to review already, we had to take a peek at what students, parents and teachers are telling us! Here are a few things that may surprise you about high school students’, parents’ and teachers’ experiences and aspirations for digital learning. Be sure to add your voice by taking the survey today!

High School Students:

  • 33% say that when their teachers want to share information with them about their personal academic progress in the class, they should text it to them!
  • More than 1/3 say they have taken a fully online, virtual class as part of school in math or English.
  • Two-thirds of students say that they use Instagram or Snapchat often or all the time; only 34% say the same about Facebook.
  • Best way to explore future careers? 72% would like to get real world experience in a part-time job or internship.
  • 55% say they use technology more outside of school than in school.

Parents:

  • 56% say they worry that their child is not learning the right skills at school to be successful in the future.
  • 43% say taking a coding or computer programming class will help their child develop skills they will need for the future.
  • Most important skills for the future: critical thinking and problem solving, per 86% of parents.
  • 49% are looking for information about what apps or software would help their child with learning at home.

 Teachers:

  • Teachers’ wish list for professional development this year includes how to use mobile devices and digital games in class.
  • 37% say they have taken an online class for PD – benefits include that it saves time and they can customize the learning process.
  • 46% have pinned a lesson on Pinterest.
  • 42% say it is likely they will post a lesson plan, video or class activity online this year for other teachers to use.

The Speak Up surveys close on January 27, 2017, so be sure to Speak Up before the deadline to be sure your experience and opinions are included in the final data! And, schools, remember, you get all your data for free!

Note: This is preliminary Speak Up data from surveys submitted between Oct 12, 2016 and November 29, 2016. It is based on surveys from 37,516 students in grade 9-12; 10,181 parents and 13,042 teachers.

How Schools Evaluate, Use and Pay for Digital Content – Speak Up 2015

In our latest infographic from Speak Up 2015 National Data, we look at some of the questions we asked administrators, teachers and librarians about digital content.

speakup-2015-digital-content-k12-instruction-october-2016We wanted to share a bit more about what administrators told use both about what they look for when evaluating digital content and how they are (and are not) planning to pay for digital content.

While Speak Up participants tell us they value getting their own school/district-level data for free, they also value what they learn just from participating. These two questions offer an example. Administrators may not have considered some of the options available to them, and we are always interested in seeing how responses to these types of questions shift over the years.

Speak Up 2016 is currently open. Students, teachers, parents and administrators across the country are taking time to share their views with us to inform education policy at the national level – and to inform decisions being made locally. Learn more about this free service, and Speak Up before January 27th!

In 2015, we asked school administrators and teachers: “Which of these factors would you consider most important when evaluating the quality of digital content to use within instruction?”

 TeachersSchool Administrators
Adjusts to multiple reading levels74%74%
Compiled on a list by our State Department of Education18%16%
Content was evaluated by a librarian or media specialist19%11%
Content was highly ranked on Google search13%5%
Includes embedded online assessments43%48%
Includes professional development35%60%
Integration into district learning management system or student information system23%30%
Materials are created by practicing teachers56%38%
Mobile app version of the content24%25%
Multiple language versions available26%32%
No commercial advertisements within the content54%47%
Recommended by education membership associations and organizations32%28%
Recommended on education blogs and websites26%18%
Referred by a colleague47%21%
Research-based58%74%
Source is a content expert organization (e.g. National Science Foundation, universities)29%31%
Source is an online curriculum company or organization12%8%
Student achievement with the materials44%46%
Teacher evaluation of the materials45%40%
Teachers can modify it to meet classroom needs71%66%
Textbook publisher recommendations9%3%
User experience25%19%

In 2015, we asked district administrators: “What is the primary way that you are currently funding your purchases, subscriptions, and/or licenses for digital tools, content, and resources to support student learning?”

 Doing thisConsidering thisNo plans
eRate funds71%5%24%
Funding from PTA/parent support groups43%11%46%
Grants or funding from district or school educational foundation67%15%18%
Local bond measures or taxes41%13%46%
Local donations or grants from corporations or foundations43%26%30%
Parents pay an annual technology fee for each child (like a music, athletic, or field trip fee)24%12%63%
Repurposing other budget funds (such as textbook funds)43%31%26%
Savings from allowing students to use their own mobile devices14%23%63%
Savings from moving some services to the cloud31%23%46%
Specific budget allocations from our general funds62%20%18%
State or federal competitive grants47%26%27%
Title 1 funds53%13%33%

10 Things Principals Told Us About Digital Learning

Before National Principals Month comes to an end, we wanted to share some of what more than 2400 principals told us about digital learning during Speak Up 2015. We look forward to hearing from even more principals during this year’s survey period, open through January 13, 2017!

10things-principals-header#1 Tech in schools is extremely important.

58% of principals say the effective implementation of instructional technology is “extremely important” to students’ success (and 54% of parents agree!).

#2 Data is informing instruction.

3/4 of principals say their school is using student data to inform instructional strategies with positive academic results.

#3 Getting social with parents and students.

52% of principals say their schools are successfully using social media to communicate with parents and students.

#4 Jumps in concerns about digital equity.

In 2007, only 12% of principals cited digital equity (students’ access to technology outside of school) as a top concern. Fast forward to 2015 – 51% of principals rank it now as a top concern!

#5 Principals are tech users too!

81% of principals text with colleagues; 73% used an online video to learn how to do something; 61% use a mobile device for note taking during classroom observations; and 36% use Twitter as an informal PD tool.

#6 Tech in English class most effective? Principals say so.

Principals say technology is used most effectively to help students develop college and career ready skills in English/Language Arts (58%), Career Technical Education (52%), Computer Science/Programming (51%) and Science (51%) classes.

#7 High school principals leading on BYOD.

While 84% of all principals say it’s important for students to use mobile devices during the school day to support schoolwork, just 26% are allowing students to actually use their own mobile devices for learning purposes. However, 41% of high school principals are allowing BYOD with another 16% saying it’s “very likely” that they will do so this year.

#8 Paperless school?

3 in 10 principals say that at least 50% of the instructional materials used at their school are now digital, rather than printed.

#9 High Techxpectations for new teachers.

Principals say new teachers should know how to use technology to differentiate instruction (76%) and to communicate with parents and students (66%). They should also know how to develop, implement, and evaluate online assessments (61%) and manage a classroom where every student has a mobile device (53%).

#10 Value of digital content.

Principals say that the top benefits of using digital content within instruction are increased student engagement (80%), increased relevancy of the curriculum (60%) and increased personalization of the learning process (60%). Are you surprised that only 32% of principals consider cost savings as a digital content benefit?

Data Snapshot: Of the 2400 principals who “spoke up” in 2015, 63% were female, 26% had more than 16 years of administrative experience and 9% were Hispanic/Latino.

Download the 10 Things Principals Told Us about Digital Learning infographic! 

It’s not too late to get your school’s FREE Speak Up Data! Surveys are open through January 13, 2017. Just register a contact person and then spread the word about the surveys with your students, parents, staff and/or community. There are no costs to participate in the surveys or to receive your data!