Tag Archives: FETC

Don’t miss our sessions at FETC 2017!

If you’re attending the Future of Education Technology Conference in Orlando, FL from January 24 – 27, be sure to check out Julie Evans’s sessions below.

Julie Evans sessions at FETC 2017

Student Engagement, Teacher Empowerment: An Extended Evaluation of the Impact of Tablets

C314
Thursday, January 26 at 1PM
Orange County Convention Center – North 220F
Click here to learn more
While interest in K-12 mobile learning continues to increase, few studies have examined in-depth the classroom impact of using mobile devices and wireless technologies to support student learning and teacher productivity. In this session, the chief researcher that led a recent three-year evaluation study of a tablet project in Chicago will reveal how access to the devices in school and out of school changed 5th graders self-efficacy as learners and empowered their teachers to transform their instructional practice.

Augmented Reality in Education: Present Accomplishments, Future Visions

C710
Friday, January 27 at 10AM
Orange County Convention Center – North 220AB
Click here to learn more
Augmented realities (AR) for learning use mobile, context-aware technologies (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical setting. This session discusses current uses of AR in education, using case studies of three projects that span learning in both formal and informal environments (i.e., schools, universities, museums, parks, zoos).

Are you attending one or both of these sessions? If so, send us a Tweet through one of our accounts (@SpeakUpEd or @ProjectTomorrow). We look forward to seeing you there!

FETC attendees, don’t miss today’s session at 10am!

Are you at the Future of Education Technology Conference (FETC) in Orlando, Florida? If so, plan to attend Julie Evans’s session TODAY at 10am with Robert Miller (Volusa County Schools) and Kari Stubbs (BrainPOP). Check out the details below:

Digital Teachers, Digital Principals: Transforming the Ways We Engage Students (CS154)
Friday 10:00-11:00 a.m
OCCC – North 220 FG
Promising new developments in the use of digital content, and specifically digital and online educational games, in elementary and middle school classrooms aim to make the connection between student engagement and empowered learning more explicit. Explore a white paper that highlights Speak Up research findings around teacher and student use of digital content and games for learning, and how administrators are increasingly supporting those efforts. Hear examples of how digital content and games are transforming classrooms and and how games can influence classroom practice via the BrainPOP GameUp portal.

Julie Evans
Chief Executive Officer, Project Tomorrow

Julie Evans is the CEO of Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org), an internationally recognized education nonprofit organization that focuses on improving learning opportunities for students through the effective utilization of STEM resources. Previously, Ms. Evans was a sales and marketing executive with Unisys and two ed tech startups. She is a graduate of Brown University and serves on several nonprofit boards and corporate advisory councils. Ms. Evans is a frequent speaker and writer on K-12 and higher education issues around digital learning. In April 2008 she was named one of the Top Ten Most Influential People in Education Technology over the past 10 years by eSchool News.

Robert Miller
5th Grade Teacher, Volusa County Schools

Robert Miller is a fifth grade teacher at Port Orange Elementary School in Port Orange, FL. An avid user of technology in his instruction, Robert is constantly revising his pedagogy to reflect current research in content delivery and student creativity. He is also an Apple Distinguished Educator, a Google Certified Teacher, and a member of the inaugural class of YouTube Star Teachers.

Kari Stubbs
Vice President, Learning and Innovation, BrainPOP

Dr. Kari Stubbs is an internationally recognized educator who began her career as a public school teacher in Kansas and Texas. She went on to lead the Kansas Title IID program, and served as an adjunct professor while earning her PhD in Curriculum with an emphasis on Technology. Currently, she serves as Vice President of Learning and Innovation at BrainPOP. Kari has presented extensively on the subject of technology and education, keynoting and speaking at conferences across the United States and around the globe from Shanghai and Dubai to Australia, Prague, Beijing, and beyond.

Don’t miss Julie’s session at FETC next week!

Are you attending the Future of Education Technology Conference (FETC) next week in Orlando, Florida? If so, plan to attend Julie Evans’s session on Friday, January 15 at 10am with Robert Miller (Volusa County Schools) and Kari Stubbs (BrainPOP). Check out the details below:

Digital Teachers, Digital Principals: Transforming the Ways We Engage Students (CS154)
Friday 10:00-11:00 a.m
OCCC – North 220 FG
Promising new developments in the use of digital content, and specifically digital and online educational games, in elementary and middle school classrooms aim to make the connection between student engagement and empowered learning more explicit. Explore a white paper that highlights Speak Up research findings around teacher and student use of digital content and games for learning, and how administrators are increasingly supporting those efforts. Hear examples of how digital content and games are transforming classrooms and and how games can influence classroom practice via the BrainPOP GameUp portal.

Julie Evans
Chief Executive Officer, Project Tomorrow

Julie Evans is the CEO of Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org), an internationally recognized education nonprofit organization that focuses on improving learning opportunities for students through the effective utilization of STEM resources. Previously, Ms. Evans was a sales and marketing executive with Unisys and two ed tech startups. She is a graduate of Brown University and serves on several nonprofit boards and corporate advisory councils. Ms. Evans is a frequent speaker and writer on K-12 and higher education issues around digital learning. In April 2008 she was named one of the Top Ten Most Influential People in Education Technology over the past 10 years by eSchool News.

Robert Miller
5th Grade Teacher, Volusa County Schools

Robert Miller is a fifth grade teacher at Port Orange Elementary School in Port Orange, FL. An avid user of technology in his instruction, Robert is constantly revising his pedagogy to reflect current research in content delivery and student creativity. He is also an Apple Distinguished Educator, a Google Certified Teacher, and a member of the inaugural class of YouTube Star Teachers.

Kari Stubbs
Vice President, Learning and Innovation, BrainPOP

Dr. Kari Stubbs is an internationally recognized educator who began her career as a public school teacher in Kansas and Texas. She went on to lead the Kansas Title IID program, and served as an adjunct professor while earning her PhD in Curriculum with an emphasis on Technology. Currently, she serves as Vice President of Learning and Innovation at BrainPOP. Kari has presented extensively on the subject of technology and education, keynoting and speaking at conferences across the United States and around the globe from Shanghai and Dubai to Australia, Prague, Beijing, and beyond.

What are your student data privacy predictions for the next five years?

Last month, the Florida Education Technology Conference (FETC), one of the largest conferences in the United States dedicated to educational technology, highlighted innovative ways in which educational technology is used in schools, as well as predictions for the future of student data privacy – a topic that has garnered much discussion in recent weeks.

“In five years, I think education technology will be completely ubiquitous, and it will be integrated into parts of the curriculum that we are just beginning to conceive of,” said Leah Plunkett, a fellow at Berkman Center for Internet and Society, during her session on data privacy with Paulina Haduong. While the growing presence and use of educational technology will bring about new opportunities for learning for students, it will also require new privacy and security policies at schools.

During their session, Plunkett and Haduong tested the audience’s attitudes towards privacy by posing hypothetical situations, such as the implementation of a robot hall monitor that notified parents if students were caught breaking school rules. The audience had several concerns about the situations, asking if the information would go into a cloud drive or private database, who the robot would be controlled by, and if students would even know if they were being monitored. The audience members also made the following data privacy predictions for the next five years:

  • What’s called education technology will become routine.
  • In five years we’ll be struggling to be more efficient.
  • Within five years the U.S. will face a catastrophic public privacy issue in the public space in the cloud.
  • We’ll be trying to get teachers up to speed on technology. Students are there.
  • A reciprocated relationship will develop between advanced teachers and inexperienced teachers who don’t have the (technological) savviness.
  • We might line up legislation to allow teachers to be innovative in the classroom to protect privacy.
  • We’ll learn what data we can safely put in the cloud.
  • Our privacy concerns will diversify over new several platforms that will develop over the next few years.
  • In five years, there will be more devices with more operating systems that will lead to more data being collected and more privacy breaches. (The Journal)

Interested in learning more? Read the original article, “Predictions for the Future of Student Data Privacy” by Patrick Peterson (The Journal), and be sure to view your Speak Up 2014 data if you have not already, as we asked questions regarding student data privacy.

What are your student data privacy predictions for the next five years? Let us know by commenting on this post, our Facebook page, or our Twitter account!