Tag Archives: games

Did you miss yesterday’s session at ISTE 2015, “Digital Teachers, Digital Principals: Transforming the Ways We Engage Students”?

If you missed Julie Evans’s session with Kari Stubbs, Robert Miller, and Matthew Brown about digital content and games yesterday at ISTE 2015, you can still download our white paper with BrainPOP that explores transformative teaching. Check out some information below:

As the new school year starts, K-12 education leaders all across the country are re-focusing their efforts on providing students with learning experiences that develop the college, career and civic readiness skills so highly coveted by higher education, employers and policymakers. In many districts, this means a significant change in curriculum and classroom teaching methodologies. Not surprisingly, school and district leaders are increasingly interested in exploring new roles for the use of emerging technologies to support this transformation of the classroom learning process.

In this whitepaper we examine the evolving role of digital content to support student learning from the perspective of the classroom teacher and the school principal. Starting with a broad review of digital content use to empower transformed learning experiences, this white paper delves specifically into the emerging role of digital games to both engage students and enable a new classroom environment.

Key Findings include:

  • Over one-third of elementary teachers (35 percent) and 1 of 5 middle school teachers (21 percent) report regular usage of digital games within their classroom.
  • These game-using teachers see the primary benefit of digital games as increased student engagement in learning (88 percent); 72 percent of digital principals agree.
  • Teachers who are using digital games in their classroom have a greater appreciation for the overall impact of technology on student outcomes and teacher effectiveness.
  • 60 percent of school principals say that having enough computers or devices with Internet access is a major obstacle to the greater adoption of digital content in their schools.
  • Both teachers and school principals share a common set of determinants for evaluating the quality of digital content.
Engaging Students, Empowering Learning: New Roles for Digital Content and Games in the Classroom is a special collaboration between BrainPOP® and Project Tomorrow®. Click here to download a copy of the report.

Digital games used to teach English-language arts

While books, poems, art, and even films have all been used to teach English-language arts to students, some teachers have taken a new route by incorporating digital games into their classrooms. Fullbright Company’s game, “Gone Home,” tells the story of Katie Greenbriar, who comes home to an empty house and missing family members after spending a year abroad. Unlike traditional video games, “Gone Home” focuses on the story rather than leveling up; critics have praised the game as a new way of storytelling, and it has made its way into classrooms as a substitute for traditional text due to its non-linear story that forces players to explore the game’s surroundings and create their own narrative and conclusions.

Toronto-based teacher Paul Darvasi began using “Gone Home” in his all-boys English class in 2013. He created objected for students around various subtopics, such as “1995 Archeology” in which students found objects from the year the game was set. The findings of each subtopic was then presented through PowerPoint, where students were assessed on their presentations. In order to individually assess the students, Darvasi required students to write game reviews and track subtopics via screen shots and notes from the game – all of which correlated to the Common Core State Standards. “In a sense, it played out similar to a typical literature unit,” Darvasi said. “Except that you are substituting written text with a game’s text.”

“Gone Home” has not only affected classrooms in the North America, but international classrooms as well. Alexander Husoy, an English teacher in Norway, came across Darvasi’s blog posts about the game and teamed up with Darvasi to co-deliver the unit in fall 2014. Students from both schools collaborate through blog posts, private Facebook groups, and even Google Hangout in order to create their final project assessments.

Last fall, the 2014 Speak Up survey asked students questions about digital games in the classroom, such as “What would be the benefits of having video, online, or digital games as a part of your regular schoolwork or classroom activities?” Find out the results from this question and more when we release our Speak Up 2014 data in early February – in the meantime, you can view past data and reports here.

Interested in learning more about “Gone Home” and its use in the classroom? Read the original article, “‘Gone Home’: A Video Game as a Tool for Teaching Critical Thinking Skills” by Ki Sung (MindShift), or visit the official “Gone Home” website.

Don’t miss Julie’s second Twitter chat – tomorrow at 8pm ET!

Julie Evans will be hosting her second Twitter chat TOMORROW (Tuesday, October 28th)! Join her at 8pm ET to discuss digital content and games. Check out some information below:

Digital Content and Games in the Classroom

Time: Tuesday, October 28th at 8PM ET/7PM CT/5PM PT

Join Julie as she discusses the role of digital content and games in the classroom. Discussion will include findings from our September 2014 report with BrainPOP, “Digital Teachers, Digital Principals: Transforming the Ways We Engage Students.”
Additionally, the following questions will be discussed during the chat:

  1. Thinking beyond engagement, what are the most important benefits of using digital content and games within instruction?
  2. How does the use of digital content in the classroom help students develop college and career ready skills?
  3. What barriers or obstacles prevent teachers and administrators from expanding their use of digital content or games in the classroom?
  4. What is the best determinant of quality in evaluating digital content and games for classroom use?
If participating, be sure to use the hashtag #SUchat in your Tweets! We hope to see you on Twitter tomorrow night at 8pm ET! Click here to sign up and receive a reminder for tomorrow’s chat.

Julie Evans is now on Twitter!

Project Tomorrow CEO, Julie Evans, is now on Twitter! She will be hosting THREE Twitter chats over the next few weeks regarding mobile learning, digital content and games in the classroom, and the benefits of blended learning. All chats will take place at 8pm Eastern Time. You can follow Julie at @JulieEvans_PT.
Below you will find all the information you need to join us on Twitter:
Evaluating Mobile Learning Join us on Tuesday, October 21st at 8pm ET to discuss mobile learning
Digital Content and Games in the Classroom Do you use digital content and games in the classroom? Join us on Tuesday, October 28th to discuss!
Blended Learning Benefits What are the benefits of blended learning in schools? Let us know on Thursday, November 6th!
As always, don’t forget to follow us on our Facebook, Twitter, and our Blog.

-The Project Tomorrow team

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Evaluating Mobile Learning

Time: Tuesday, October 21st at 8PM ET/7PM CT/5PM PT

While attending the 2014 mEducation Alliance International Symposium, Julie will take content from the event and our report with Kajeet, “Making Learning Mobile: Leveraging Mobile Devices to Transform Teaching and Learning” onto Twitter during the “Evaluating Mobile Learning” Twitter chat. Join her to discuss how schools can use and evaluate mobile learning!
If participating, be sure to use the hashtag #SUchat in your Tweets!
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Digital Content and Games in the Classroom

Time: Tuesday, October 28th at 8PM ET/7PM CT/5PM PT

Join Julie as she discusses the role of digital content and games in the classroom. Discussion will include findings from our September 2014 report with BrainPOP, “Digital Teachers, Digital Principals: Transforming the Ways We Engage Students.”
If participating, be sure to use the hashtag #SUchat in your Tweets!
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Blended Learning Benefits

Time: Thursday, November 6th at 8PM ET/7PM CT/5PM PT

Julie will be hosting a discussion on the benefits of blended learning while she is at the 2014 iNACOL Blended Learning Symposium. During this Twitter chat, she will include topics mentioned at the symposium, as well as data from past Project Tomorrow reports, such as our report, “2013 Trends In Online Learning Virtual, Blended And Flipped Classrooms” with Blackboard K-12.
If participating, be sure to use the hashtag #SUchat in your Tweets!
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Thank you for your interest and continued support of Project Tomorrow! Be sure to stay updated on all things Project Tomorrow by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and our Blog. Again, don’t forget to follow Julie Evans at @JulieEvans_PT!