Author Archives: Project Tomorrow

For Immediate Release:                            
February 4, 2014                                                 

Contact: Amber Taylor
703-201-4893 

Project Tomorrow Named as Partner in 100Kin10, National Network to Grow STEM Teaching Force
Project Tomorrow’s YouthTEACH2Learn Program Educates High School Students about Teaching Careers
Irvine, Calif. Project Tomorrow, a national education nonprofit organization, is one of the latest partners of 100Kin10, a multi-sector network addressing the national imperative to train 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers by 2021.
“Being selected as a 100kin10 partner will support our on-going efforts to help recruit new teachers in California,” said Julie Evans, CEO of Project Tomorrow. “Our YouthTEACH2Learn initiative is providing high school students the opportunity to learn about teaching, and it is developing new pipelines for math and science teachers – a perfect fit for 100kin10’s ambitious national goal.”
Project Tomorrow’s YouthTEACH2Learn program is a career exploration program where students gain first-hand experiences with teaching as a career. During the high school or after school program, students learn about teaching strategies and gain practical experience by developing and teaching standards-based math and science lessons to younger students in neighboring elementary schools. As Project Tomorrow is the host organization for the California Future Educators Association, these young educators also have the opportunity to pursue career development activities with peers in after school chapter activities at their high school and in their community.   
As part of 100Kin10, Project Tomorrow has committed to recruit 2,050 excellent STEM teacher candidates, with 25 percent of those new teachers coming from groups traditionally under-represented in STEM, in California by 2018. Project Tomorrow aims to achieve this goal by leveraging the organization’s innovative programming that puts a focus on moving the starting line for teacher career development from college to high school.  
More and better-trained STEM teachers are essential to prepare America’s students to fully participate in our democracy and to understand and respond to complex national and global challenges. To compete in the global marketplace and provide opportunity to all young Americans, all students—not  just those fortunate enough to attend certain schools— must have basic STEM skills and knowledge. Project Tomorrow is one of nearly 200 100Kin10 partners unified by a single, ambitious goal: to prepare all students with the high-quality STEM knowledge and skills to equip them for success in college and the workplace.
Organizations are accepted as 100Kin10 partners following a rigorous vetting process conducted by a team of partner reviewers and the University of Chicago. Reviewers are looking for organizations that bring innovation, boldness, and a proven track-record to their commitment(s) toward expanding, improving, and retaining the best of the nation’s STEM teaching force, or building the 100Kin10 movement.  A complete list of partners is available on the 100Kin10 website.
As partners fulfill their ambitious commitments and work together to spark innovation, they have access to exclusive opportunities—including competitive research opportunities, solution labs, collaboration grants, a growing research and learning platform, and a funding marketplace. Each of these is designed to foster collaborative problem-solving and support partners in fulfilling their ambitious commitments.
In January 2014, 100Kin10 launched its third fund with $5 million and leadership from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, and the Overdeck Family Foundation. To date, 100Kin10 funding partners have committed more than $57 million in support of the work of the partners. Over $31 million has already been distributed to partner organizations in 99 grants since the first fund launched in June 2011.
In the first two years of the effort, 100Kin10 partners who have committed to increase the supply of great STEM teachers have recruited and prepared 12,412 teachers. They are projected to prepare just shy of 37,000 teachers by 2016, five years into the project’s ten-year timeline. The network’s continued growth (through organizations such as those announced here) will add to this total number. In addition, nearly 75 partners are working to support and improve existing teachers so that more of them stay in the profession, with the goal of over time reducing the need for so many new teachers entering the workforce.
About Project Tomorrow
Project Tomorrow® is the nation’s leading education nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education.  We believe that by supporting the innovative uses of science, math and technology resources in our K-12 schools and communities, students will develop the critical thinking, problem solving and creativity skills needed to compete and thrive in the 21st century. We approach our mission through national research projects, the development of innovative career exploration projects in schools and communities, online tools and resources for students, teachers and parents, and national and regional advocacy efforts.  Learn more at www.tomorrow.org
About 100Kin10
100Kin10 is a multi-sector network that responds to the national imperative to train and retain 100,000 excellent science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers by 2021. http://www.100kin10.org/

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Exciting News! Project Tomorrow Named as Partner in 100Kin10, National Network to Grow STEM Teaching Force!

Project Tomorrow commits to advancing the goal of recruiting, preparing, and retaining 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers in 10 years
100Kin10, a multi-sector network addressing the national imperative to train 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers by 2021, today announced that Project Tomorrow has been accepted as a partner.
With a highly selective and competitive selection process, Project Tomorrow is extremely honored to be one of only 31 organizations chosen nationwide in this year’s application process. As part of 100Kin10, Project Tomorrow will recruit 2,050 excellent STEM teacher candidates, with 25% (512) from groups traditionally under-represented in STEM, in California by 2018, as measured by the number of students majoring or minoring in education and a science or math discipline.
More and better-trained STEM teachers are essential to prepare America’s students to fully participate in our democracy and to understand and respond to complex national and global challenges. To compete in the global marketplace and provide opportunity to all young Americans, all students—not  just those fortunate enough to attend certain schools— must have basic STEM skills and knowledge. Project Tomorrow is one of nearly 200 100Kin10 partners unified by a single, ambitious goal: to prepare all students with the high-quality STEM knowledge and skills to equip them for success in college and the workplace.
Organizations are accepted as 100Kin10 partners following a rigorous vetting process conducted by a team of partner reviewers and the University of Chicago. Reviewers are looking for organizations that bring innovation, boldness, and a proven track-record to their commitment(s) toward expanding, improving, and retaining the best of the nation’s STEM teaching force, or building the 100Kin10 movement.

 

A complete list of partners—with new partners highlighted— is available on the 100Kin10 website.

Speak Up Data cited on CBS Evening News!

On Sunday January 19, 2014 CBS Evening News included a segment on Flipped learning titled: “Flipped classrooms provide a new way of learning”- and we are excited to share that Speak Up Data was referenced in the segment! Watch the segment below or access the article and video at: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/flipped-classrooms-provide-a-new-way-of-learning/ 

A special thank you to Kari Arfstrom with the Flipped Learning Network for sharing our Speak Up 2012 data results on flipped learning to be included in the segment!


Speak Up is a national initiative of Project Tomorrow®, the nation’s leading education nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education. Each year, the Speak Up National Research Project polls K-12 students, parents and educators about the role of technology for learning in and out of school. This survey represents the largest collection of authentic, unfiltered stakeholder voices on digital learning. Since fall 2003, over 3.4 million K-12 students, parents, teachers, librarians, principals, technology leaders, district administrators and members of the community have shared their views and ideas through Speak Up. K-12 educators, higher education faculty, business and policy leaders report that they regularly use the Speak Up data to inform federal, state and local education programs.

 

In fall 2013, Project Tomorrow surveyed 325,279 K-12 students, 32,151 parents, 37,756 teachers, 2,230 librarians, 933 district administrators, 3,020 school administrators, 577 technology leaders and 1,346 members of the community representing  over 8,000 public and private schools from over 2,000 districts. The Speak Up 2013 surveys were available online for input between October 2nd and December 20th 2013. Speak Up 2013 data will be released to all participating schools and districts that participated on February 5, 2014 in celebration of digital learning day
 
To learn more about how your school or district can get involved with this year’s Speak Up surveys please visit our website at www.tomorrow.org/speakup

Around the Web Wednesday!

Happy Around the Web Wednesday! Browse all the links below for the latest news and topics trending in education and technology. Be sure to let us know which article intrigued you the most!

Be sure the check back each week for our Around the Web Wednesday series. Have a great day!
– The Project Tomorrow Team
Making BYOT Work – THE Journal

Model by Day, Coder by Night

When we think of coding we tend to associate the word with Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg. After all, the software industry is generally dominated by men and the most well-known social entrepreneurs are male.

Breaking down stereotypes about coding and the software industry, Lyndsey Scott is just the opposite of that. Dubbed by her family as a mix between Giselle Bundchen and Bill Gates, she entered Amherst as a theater major and picked up Computer Science as a second major. Although her interest in software began at a young age when she programmed her TI-89 calculator with games of her own creation, she only began modelling after college and has now modeled for Victoria’s Secret, Gucci, and Prada. Despite her success on the runway, Lyndsey still finds time to code and has developed several apps for Apple, including an iPad app that serves as a digital portfolio for models and an app called Educate!, which helps students in Uganda find sponsors.

Given her two very different careers, Lyndsey is aware of the struggles that come with being a female coder. “[The fashion industry] wouldn’t talk about my education,” she said. Because of her experience in both the software programming industry and fashion industry, Lyndsey is an advocate for girls getting into coding and computers, and has spoken about Code.org’s Hour of Code, a campaign designed to recruit students to try computer science for at least one hour; she pointed out that of the 20 million students who were given the opportunity to try programming, most participants were female. Lyndsey believes that more girls will become interested in programming and technology as long as they are given the opportunity to do so.

To read the full article for “What It’s Like To Be A Victoria’s Secret Model Who Codes In Her Free Time” by Business Insider, click here. Also check out http://code.org/ to learn more about the organization and the Hour of Code. What do you think about the future of female coders? Did your child(ren)/students participate in the Hour of Code? Let us know in the comments section!

Getting to Know the Project Tomorrow Team

Happy Friday!

We hope you all had a fantastic week! It’s Friday which means it’s time to meet another one of our fabulous team members. Today we would like to introduce you to Lisa, our Project Support Coordinator!

Lisa Chu

Program Support Coordinator
Project Tomorrow
949-609-4660 x11 voice
Lisa joined Project Tomorrow in fall 2013 as an intern and now serves as the Program Support Coordinator for Project Tomorrow, where she manages the blog & social media accounts, as well as lends support for Speak Up and other programs. She is currently a senior at the University of California, Irvine, where she majors in Sociology and Economics and is set to graduate this upcoming June. Lisa has a passion for education: she previously interned at Horton’s Kids, a non-profit education geared towards helping and tutoring at-risk youth in Washington DC, and currently teaches high school freshmen about globalization/global issues through Global Connect at UC Irvine.


In her free time Lisa enjoys running, trying new places to eat, and spending time with friends and family.

Please be sure to check back next week to meet Nayssan Safavian, our new Research Analyst!

Thanks for reading!

-The Project Tomorrow Team



Launching a BYOD Program: Complicated Yet Rewarding

Launching a Bring Your Own Device program in schools can be both exciting and complicated. While the addition of technology in classrooms and homes is exhilarating, school districts may struggle with important details such as making sure each child owns a device, providing a strong Internet connection, and questions around distraction. Although each school has different problems regarding BYOD, it can be agreed that the inclusion of mobile technology in learning environments will help shift instruction to be more collaborative, learner-driven, and inquiry-based.

Forsyth County Schools in Georgia tackled their BYOD program struggles by creating a learner profile (a set of criteria the school district wanted students to learn in school) and by changing the culture surrounding devices. By creating a learner profile, Forsyth was able to guide schools within the district to focus on critical thinking skills, students’ readiness to compete in a global environment, and communication skills among other things. Furthermore, by changing the culture surrounding devices, the district was able to show students that mobile devices can be used for educational purposes and not just for texting and Facebook. The district has even incorporated social media into the classroom by introducing students to “back-channeling,” which is an ongoing conversation on social media about what students are watching; back-channeling enables teachers to see how students respond to the material before moving to the next lesson.

To read the full article for “How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning” (Mind/shift), click here. Have experience implementing a BYOD program at your own school? Let us know in the comments section of this post!

Around the Web Wednesday

Happy Around the Web Wednesday! Browse all the links below for the latest news and topics trending in education and technology. Be sure to let us know which article intrigued you the most!

Be sure the check back each week for our Around the Web Wednesday series. Have a great day!
– The Project Tomorrow Team

Ed Tech and Activism are Reinventing Education 30 Under 30 – Forbes
Online education attracts seekers of knowledge around the world – Digital Journal
Are these 8 trends the future of K-12? – eSchool News
Prioritizing Student Data Privacy in the Cloud and Beyond – Huffington Post
How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning – Mind/Shift
Tech Companies Work to Combat Computer Science Education Gap – US News
The Promising Future of Virtual spEd – Huffington Post
What It’s Like to be a Victoria’s Secret Model Who Codes in Her Free Time – Business Insider
One amazing example of how to train teachers on technology – eSchool News
How Can Developers Make Meaningful Learning Games for Classrooms? – Mind/Shift

Making Learning Mobile: Leveraging Mobile Devices to Transform Teaching and Learning

“This project represents a landmark study in the developing K-12 mobile learning space, this study is important because it gets beyond simply putting a tablet in the hands of students, and it examines how to effectively implement tablets within instruction to improve student learning” 
—Julie Evans, CEO Project Tomorrow

Despite the increase in use of mobile devices as classroom tools, some educators are still skeptical that these devices will distract students rather than enhance the learning environment. We teamed up with Kajeet for Education, the only wireless service provider dedicated to kids and education, to provide Chicago 5th grade and Fairfax County 8th grade students with educationally-managed broadband Android tablets using the Kajeet Sentinel Platform® to connect kids in school and at home. The Making Learning Mobile study evaluates how students use the devices (in school and out of school) to support their schoolwork and extend learning beyond the classroom, and also evaluates how teachers use the tablets to enhance the learning environment.

The study found that students used the tablets for more educational activities than expected. 93% of students used the tablet for Internet research, while 39% used it for completing video projects. Other uses of the device include project work, educational games, checking grades, and communicating with teachers and classmates. Furthermore, acces to Internet at home improved greatly when students were able to take their devices home to perform after school research. Students took advantage of this improvement in Internet access, as the Kajeet software on the devices noted that “three-quarters of the device requests for access to learning or academic websies occurred [after school]”; the software also found that students used the Internet and their devices to research topics discussed in class once they got home.

Students were not the only ones who benefited from tablet use within the classroom. Although teachers are more hesitant about using mobile devices within the classroom, the teachers in the study saw positive changes within the classroom due to the use of tablets. One teacher at Falconer Elementary School in Chicago used tablets for educational games, grade checking, and calendar keeping. Another used it for class polling apps, note taking, and educational games. While teachers are cautious about using a new piece of technology within the classroom, the use of tablets provide a “more meaningful environment for student impact, both in terms of classroom activities as well as extending learning beyond the school day.”

While each school in the study yielded different results due to classroom size, age, and etc., the study found a few common results. Students enjoyed using tablets because they provided easier Internet access at school, enabled students to review class materials and textbooks whenever they wanted to. Teachers enjoyed the tablets due to their flexible use in engaging students in learning and ability to increase student-teacher communications.

Want to learn more about the Making Learning Mobile study? Check out “Tablets for Fifth Graders? Teachers Try Different Tactics” by Katrina Schwartz on MindShift. You can also register for the webinar at http://tinyurl.com/webinarMLM and download the complete report from both school districts on the Kajeet website athttp://www.kajeet.com/4u/education/MLM-form.html.



Speak Up 2013 is now closed for input. Thank you to everyone who participated in this year’s survey!

Welcome back parents, educators, administrators, and students! We hope you all had a great winter break.
Speak Up 2013 is now closed for input. Special thanks to all the students, teachers, administrators, parents and community members who participated in making this year’s survey a success! All participating schools and districts will receive free online access to their local data with national benchmarks beginning February 5, 2014 in celebration of Digital Learning Day. To view past Speak Up local data results,

 

This year 403,292 Students, Parents, Educators and members of the community representing over 8,000 schools nationwide participated in Speak Up. Thank you to everyone that participated for supporting the mission of Project Tomorrow to ensure that every student has access to innovative learning opportunities. Learn more about the great promotions and happenings that took place during “Speak Up America 2013”, please click here.
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Speak Up 2013 Final Count:

403,292 total surveys taken
Students: 325,279
Teachers: 39,986
Administrators: 4,530
Parents: 32,151
Community Members: 1,346

Our top participants:

Top States
Texas with 79,540 participants
California with 50,081 participants
Alabama with 34,099 participants
Indiana with 32,381 participants
North Carolina 26,635 participants

Top DistrictsKlein ISD, TX
McAllen ISD, TX
Weslaco ISD, TX
Shelby County School District, AL
Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

Top Schools
North Carolina Virtual School, NC
Weslaco High School, TX
Newport Harbor High, CA
Memorial High School, TX
Florida Virtual School, FL

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Speak Up America 2013 Contest Winners:

Photo Challenge Winners

Monday
Dr. Karl Ochsner
7th/8th grade Teacher
Pope John XXIII Catholic School
AZ

Tuesday
Ashton Burk
First Grade Teacher
North-Hopewell Winterstown Elementary,
Red Lion Area School District
PA

Wednesday
Aptakisic Junior High
Aptakisic-Tripp School District 102
IL

Thursday
Carleen Southard,
Library Media Tech III
Mission Hills High School Library
San Marcos Unified School District
CA

Friday
Mark Rivadeneyra
Marco Forster Middle School
Capistrano Unified School District
CA

ISTE Conference Registration Winners

Speak Up America Day Winner
Onslow County Schools, North Carolina

Speak Up America Week Winner
Fairfax County Public Schools, Virginia

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Again, thank you for your support in making this year’s survey a success! We look forward to your participation in Speak Up 2014.