Exciting STEM opportunity for high school students

To encourage more students to purse the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), Edwards Lifesciences Foundation is sponsoring two scholarships for high school students (incoming juniors and seniors) to participate in the Edwards Lifesciences Center for Advanced Cardiovascular Technology at UCI’s CardioStart program.

This six-week program will take place between July 6 and August 14, 2015 and teaches students to explore the worlds of cells and tissue biology beyond the textbook through hands-on, bench top and research projects. Please see the above flyer and visit http://cardiovascular.eng.uci.edu/cardiostart to learn more.

Students 16 and over with a minimum GPA of 3.0 may apply by emailing cardio@uci.edu and requesting an application form. The deadline for applications is Monday, March 2, 2015.

February 18th Webinar: Learn How Technology is Improving the Classroom Experience

Join executive leadership Michael Flood from Kajeet and Julie Evans from Project Tomorrow, for a webinar on Wednesday, February 18 at 4 PM EST. This event will focus on the findings of a two year long research study which took an in-depth look at the impact of 1-to-1 tablet implementation in elementary and middle schools. The project was sponsored by Kajeet with funding from Qualcomm’s Wireless Reach Initiative. Find out more about:

  • Increased student engagement in lessons which resulted in higher scores
  • Teacher adaptation to Mobile Learning which led to increased student reading and writing fluency
  • At-home Internet access led to higher student/family engagement, contributing to academic success
  • Detailed explanation of how Kajeet is working on bridging the digital divide

 

Date: Wednesday, February 18, 2015
Time: 4:00 PM Eastern Standard Time
Problems Registering?
Please contact Ayesha Lodhi at alodhi@kajeet.com for assistance.

Around the Web Wednesday

Happy Around the Web Wednesday! Browse all the links below for the latest news and topics trending in education and technology. Be sure to let us know which article intrigued you the most!

What are your student data privacy predictions for the next five years?

Last month, the Florida Education Technology Conference (FETC), one of the largest conferences in the United States dedicated to educational technology, highlighted innovative ways in which educational technology is used in schools, as well as predictions for the future of student data privacy – a topic that has garnered much discussion in recent weeks.

“In five years, I think education technology will be completely ubiquitous, and it will be integrated into parts of the curriculum that we are just beginning to conceive of,” said Leah Plunkett, a fellow at Berkman Center for Internet and Society, during her session on data privacy with Paulina Haduong. While the growing presence and use of educational technology will bring about new opportunities for learning for students, it will also require new privacy and security policies at schools.

During their session, Plunkett and Haduong tested the audience’s attitudes towards privacy by posing hypothetical situations, such as the implementation of a robot hall monitor that notified parents if students were caught breaking school rules. The audience had several concerns about the situations, asking if the information would go into a cloud drive or private database, who the robot would be controlled by, and if students would even know if they were being monitored. The audience members also made the following data privacy predictions for the next five years:

  • What’s called education technology will become routine.
  • In five years we’ll be struggling to be more efficient.
  • Within five years the U.S. will face a catastrophic public privacy issue in the public space in the cloud.
  • We’ll be trying to get teachers up to speed on technology. Students are there.
  • A reciprocated relationship will develop between advanced teachers and inexperienced teachers who don’t have the (technological) savviness.
  • We might line up legislation to allow teachers to be innovative in the classroom to protect privacy.
  • We’ll learn what data we can safely put in the cloud.
  • Our privacy concerns will diversify over new several platforms that will develop over the next few years.
  • In five years, there will be more devices with more operating systems that will lead to more data being collected and more privacy breaches. (The Journal)

Interested in learning more? Read the original article, “Predictions for the Future of Student Data Privacy” by Patrick Peterson (The Journal), and be sure to view your Speak Up 2014 data if you have not already, as we asked questions regarding student data privacy.

What are your student data privacy predictions for the next five years? Let us know by commenting on this post, our Facebook page, or our Twitter account!

Project Tomorrow featured in The Journal

Earlier this week, Project Tomorrow, Kajeet, and Qualcomm’s Wireless Reach Initiative were featured in Dian Schaffhauser’s “Internet Access as Vital as Devices to Boosting the Learning Experience” in The Journal. The article discusses the results from our three-year study at Falconer Elementary School in Chicago, IL, which were published in our Making Learning Mobile 2.0 Report. Read an excerpt from Schaffhauser’s article below:

 “Within the school 127 fifth grade students and their four teachers were outfitted with Samsung Android tablets and SmartSpots for personal use. Just over a third of the students told the researchers that they didn’t have access to high-speed Internet at home.

As part of the study, the four teachers also received 56 hours of professional development, coaching and mentoring ‘to increase their effectiveness with using the tablets for instruction.’ Because this was the second year of the study, the researchers initially thought the educators would have a greater ‘comfort level’ in their use of the device and online tools within their instruction. However, staffing changes meant that only two of the original four were part of the fifth grade class in the second year, which meant half the teacher team still had a learning curve. Yet, noted the report, ‘The teachers’ strong commitment to professional development and their willingness to incorporate new strategies and resources into their classroom is a hallmark of a successful and maturing mobile learning project.'”

Interested in learning more about the Making Learning Mobile study? Read the Journal’s article, “Internet Access as Vital as Devices to Boosting the Learning Experience” by Dian Schaffhauser, and check out the Making Learning Mobile 2.0 Report.

THE Journal is dedicated to informing and educating K-12 senior-level district and school administrators, technologists, and tech-savvy educators within districts, schools, and classrooms to improve and advance the learning process through the use of technology. Launched in 1972, THE Journal was the first magazine to cover education technology. THE Journal is the leading resource for administrative, technical, and academic technology leaders in K-12 education.

Your Speak Up data is in!

We are excited to release the Speak Up 2014 data results to all participating organizations! If your school or district participated in Speak Up between October and December of last year, it’s time to dig in and see what your students, teachers, parents and community members had to say. Keep reading to learn how to access your data and more.

Quick links:

▪ Your survey results are now available! Learn how to access your Speak Up data results.
▪ Exporting your data is easy: Simply print the results or copy and paste them into one of our templates.
▪ Need help with your Speak Up data? Learn more about our Speak Up services.
▪ Speak Up on the go! Learn more about upcoming presentations with our CEO, Julie Evans. 

For more than a decade, Speak Up has been providing this service to schools and districts around the country. We’re excited to see how this data informs your initiatives, policies and practices. Drop us a note and let us know how you use the data this year or how we can make the surveys even more useful next year. We love hearing from you! Feel free to share your thoughts with us on Facebook,Twitter, and our Blog.

-The Project Tomorrow team

***

Access your Speak Up results online

All schools and districts around the country who registered for Speak up 2014 can now access their data for free – here’s how:

1. Click here to access your reports.
2. Select either Option 1 to view District results or Option 2 to view individual School results.
3. Next, enter the state, the first few letters of your district or school name and your admin password.
4. To view data reports, select the number in the “# of District Surveys” column to display that survey type.
5. To view your open ended text responses, click on “District ” in the Open Ended Responses Column.
6. Print the results or copy and paste them into your own file or this Speak Up Data Excel Template. To view your data across audiences and by theme, use ourthematic report template to drop in your school or district’s data.

*Please note, at least one survey must be present to display the survey results with state and national comparisons.

Exporting your Speak Up data

Exporting your Speak Up data is quick and easy! Just follow these steps:

1. Highlight and copy the Speak Up data by survey type from our Speak Up data homepage.
2. Paste your data into our template Excel spreadsheet (click here to download) – the survey types are already organized by tab.
3. The file is already formatted to print, making it easy to view your data!

Click here to learn more about accessing your data, or watch our quick how-to video here.
***

Need help?

The Project Tomorrow staff is available to help you effectively use your data, here are just a few of the services we can provide you:
▪ Identify the top 5 trends in your school, district or state with national benchmarks
▪ Create a Speak Up presentation that you can use to share your Speak Up results in your school or district
▪ Provide Speak Up fast facts that can be used on your website, newsletters or promotional material
▪ Present your Speak Up data in person or via a webinar
▪ Prepare a summary of your specific Speak Up findings (school, district or state) that can be distributed to your stakeholders
▪ Write a case statement, using the Speak Up data, highlighting the benefits of investing in technology (school, district, state or national)
▪ Prepare a customized narrative report about your Speak Up data (school, district or state)
Contact the Speak Up Team, to learn more about our consulting services and fees.
***

Speak Up On the Go!

Upcoming presentations

The Current Pulse on Ed Tech
NASSP Conference
San Diego, CA
Friday, February 20th
Workshop: Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Gender-Sensitive Mobile Learning Projects in Educational Settings
UNESCO’s Mobile Learning Week
Paris, France
Monday, February 23rd

Your Speak Up 2014 data is now available! Learn how to access your data here:

Your data is in! If your school or district participated in Speak Up between October and December of last year, it’s time to dig in and see what your students, teachers, parents and community members had to say. You get all of the qualitative data as well as the responses to this year’s open-ended questions.
You can also access the results for your state and the overall national findings – so you can see how your community compares.
You’ll need your login and password to access your data. If you don’t have it, go to our website to retrieve your password.

All schools and districts around the country who registered for Speak up 2014 can now access their data for free. Here’s how.
1.) Click hereto access your reports.
2) Select either Option 1 to view District results or Option 2 to view individual School results.
3.) Next, enter the state, the first few letters of your district or school name and your admin password.
4.) To view data reports, select the number in the “# of District (School) Surveys” column to display that survey type.
5.) To view your open ended text responses, click on “District (School)” in the Open Ended Responses Column.
6.) Print the results or copy and paste them into your own file or this Speak Up Data Excel Template. To view your data across audiences and by theme, use our thematic report template to drop in your school or district’s data.
*Please note, at least one survey must be present to display the survey results with state and national comparisons.
For more than a decade, Speak Up has been providing this service to schools and districts around the country. We’re excited to see how this data informs your initiatives, policies and practices. Drop us a note and let us know how you use the data this year or how we can make the surveys even more useful next year. We love hearing from you!

Click here to access your data

What Texans Said about Technology and Learning

The 2014 Speak Up data is in! As part of our time at this year’s TCEA Convention, we decided to take a look at what students, parents and educators in the Texas had to say about technology and learning during this year’s surveys. More than 83,000 Texans weighed in – more participation than from any other state!
Texas parents expressed strong concern about their children’s futures and whether or not they think their children’s schools are helping to prepare them for careers:
  • Like parents nationwide, Texas parents have three primary concerns about their child’s future:
    • My child is not learning the right skills in school to be successful in the future (57%)
    • My child is going to need more than a college degree to get a good job (47%)
    • My child is going to have to compete with better educated workers around the globe (45%)
  • Texas parents were also asked about the best ways for their child to acquire the “right skills” for future careers. Their top responses should be very interesting for both education and community leaders:
    • Use technology in classes at school (75%)
    • Get real world job experience through summer or part time jobs or internships (75%)
    • Participate in school leadership activities (66%)
    • Learn an additional language (64%)
    • Participate in sports teams or academic groups (61%)
Texas parents also appear to be leading the nation in terms of their desire for more use of technology to connect with their child’s teachers and school.  
  • 37% of Texas parents say that they would like to use a school or class mobile app for better school-to-home communications (vs. 30% of parents nationwide).
  • 60% of Texas parents would like their child’s teacher to send text messages to their mobile device about class or school news (vs. 48% of parents nationwide).
  • However, only 27% of Texas teachers say they are currently using text messaging to communicate with their students’ parents.
In our review of the data, we noted some interesting “disconnects” between the various groups when it came to access to mobile devices:
  • While 75% of Texas students in grades 6-12 and 86% of school principals say it is important for every student to have access to a mobile device (laptop, tablet or Chromebook) in class to support schoolwork, 53% of Texas teachers say that their students do not have regular access to mobile devices to use in their classrooms.
  • Note: 57% of Texas high school students and 66% of Texas middle school students say that the use of technology in school increases their engagement and interest in the learning process.
We asked about the state of online and virtual classes and found not only a disconnect, but a lack of preparedness by school districts for this mode of learning:
  • More than half of Texas school principals (56%) and parents (52%) think students should be required to take a fully online or virtual class as a high school graduation requirement, but only 34% of high school students agree.
  • Much more work is necessary before such requirements can be implemented. Per Texas school principals, 74% say they are not offering any fully online or virtual classes for their students currently.
  • Of those that are offering this type of learning experience, it is limited to the core subjects of English, math, science and social studies. Only 10% of Texas principals say they are offering online classes in world languages even though 25% of high school students say they would like to learn another language online.
  • Note: Parents’ appreciation for online learning may be based upon their own personal experiences; 51% of Texas parents say they have taken an online class for their own work-related professional development.
Students, parents, teachers and administrators in Texas have different views on the value of various digital tools and resources to support learning. When asked to identify the digital tools that should be included in an “ultimate school” for today’s learners, the Speak Up responses demonstrate that the different stakeholder groups do not yet share a common value proposition on many popular technology initiatives.
Digital Tools for Ultimate School
TX Gr 6-8 students
Parents
Teachers
Principals
Internet access campus wide
78%
55%
76%
79%
Students use their own mobile devices at school for learning
71%
45%
45%
52%
Mobile apps for education
67%
61%
49%
62%
Digital content
65%
63%
56%
63%
Educational digital games
64%
24%
47%
49%
Online textbooks
60%
64%
50%
63%
As the national interest in the need to prepare students for STEM continues, we have asked about student interest in science, technology, engineering and math fields for years:
  • Aligning with national Speak Up data, 27% of Texas middle school students (Grades 6-8) say they are very interested in a STEM career field. But equally significant is the 36% who say that they are somewhat interested.  Supporting the idea that coding can be a meaningful way to increase student interest in STEM, 57% of Texas middle school students say they would be interested in taking an in-school or after-school class on how to learn to code.
Across Texas, 83,881 total surveys were submitted; 40 Districts submitted at least 10 surveys; 362 schools submitted at least 10 surveys. Break down of participants: 70,090 K-12 Students, 7,939 Teachers & Librarians, 3,813 Parents (in English & Spanish), 783 School/District Administrators, 1,256 Community Members.
 
All schools and districts around the country who registered for Speak up 2014 can access their data beginning tomorrow (2/4/15) for free at
Learn more about the Speak Up Research Project

How does your school/district plan on using your Speak Up data?

With the Speak Up 2014 survey data release this Wednesday, February 4th, now is the perfect time to start thinking about how your school/district can use your data. We asked last year’s top participating schools and districts how they used their data – check them out below for ideas on how you can use yours:

“Through the years I have used Speak Up data to help prepare the District’s strategic plan, to plan professional development, and to help shape a shared vision of how technology and core curriculum should be delivered. Survey results have been referenced when planning the district’s budget and prioritizing technology infrastructure and instructional technology investments. Speak Up data has been used to help craft and secure competitive grants and it has led to the consideration and creation of new courses.”
—Paul Caputo, Southern Columbia Area School District (PA)

“Responses from the survey are used as evidence and documentation to support district technology initiatives. Each year, the responses are reviewed by the district’s Technology Advisory Committee and shared with district and building administrators to determine areas of focus for future planning. Additionally, the district incorporates Speak Up data into the Educational Technology Plan.”
—Dr. Kristy Sailors, Blue Valley School District (KS)

“[By using our Speak Up data] we targeted specific questions and asked each school to address those needs in their school teach plans.  We pulled out specific responses on a few specific questions for our district accreditation.”
—Lauren Woolley, Shelby County (AL)

“Speak Up data has helped garner support for 1 to 1 initiatives, increased professional development and changes in instructional best practices and expectations.”
—Rod Carnill, Frederick County Public Schools (VA)

Click here to read more testimonials from past participants, and click here to learn more about the data release.

How does your school/district plan on using your Speak Up data? Let us know by commenting on this post, tweeting us (@SpeakUpEd or @ProjectTomorrow), or posting on our Facebook page.

Nominations now open for the ISTE Mobile Learning Network Teacher/Educator Mobile Learning Innovator Award

Nominations are now open for the ISTE Mobile Learning Network Teacher/Educator Mobile Learning Innovator Award! You can nominate yourself or someone else until February 28 for the chance to be recognized at the International Society for Technology and Education Conference and Expo 2015 in Philadelphia. Learn more about the award below:

The ISTE Mobile Learning Network would like to recognize teachers and educators who are doing innovative projects that engage learners. Innovation is driven by a commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. Innovation is based on curiosity, the willingness to take risks, and experimenting to test assumptions. Innovation is based on questioning and challenging the status quo, and it is based on recognizing opportunity and taking advantage of it.

Nominees will be judged on how their mobile learning innovation

  • Increases knowledge and value in education
  • Demonstrates a clear understanding of needs and potential solutions in the mobile learning environment
  • Facilitates growth and sharing in the learning community

ISTE members can nominate themselves or a colleague using the online nomination form.

Click here to learn more about the ISTE Mobile Learning Network and the award.

 

The ISTE Mobile Learning Network, formerly SIGML, is a worldwide advocate for mobile learning that promotes meaningful integration of mobile devices in learning and teaching in formal and informal learning environments.