Tag Archives: Speak Up

Project Tomorrow Celebrates Digital Learning Day 2015

Happy Digital Learning Day! Project Tomorrow is proud to be a longstanding Core Partner in Digital Learning Day. Subsequently, we’ve released a new participation map and a special sneak peek at the 2014 National Findings for K-12 students titled: Top Ten Things Everyone Should Know About K-12 Students’ Views on Digital Learning. Additionally all 2014 Speak Up district contacts now have access to a new data report to help with data analysis.
Not sure what Digital Learning Day is about? Keep reading to learn more about the event, as well as ways you can get involved.

Quick links:

▪ Digital Learning Day 2015: Learn more about this annual celebration, as well as ways to get involved.
▪ Top Ten Things Everyone Should Know About K-12 Students’ Views on Digital Learning: Get a sneak peek at the 2014 National Findings for K-12 students. 
▪ Speak Up 2014 Participation Map: We’ve created a new and improved participation map in honor of #DLDay – check it out!
▪ New data report for district contacts: If your district participated in Speak Up 2014, check out this new way to view your data.

Thanks for reading! Feel free to share your thoughts with us on FacebookTwitter, and our Blog. Don’t forget to share your digital learning celebrations with@OfficialDLDay and with the hashtag #DLDay!

-The Project Tomorrow team

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Happy Digital Learning Day

Digital Learning Day 2015

About Digital Learning Day

Since 2012, Digital Learning Day has provided a powerful venue for education leaders to highlight great teaching practice and showcase innovative teachers, leaders, and instructional technology programs that are improving student outcomes. This grassroots effort blossomed into a massive nationwide celebration as teachers realized that Digital Learning Day is not about technology, it’s about learning. It’s not about laying off teachers for laptops, it’s about enhancing the role of the teacher in America’s classrooms. Digital Learning Day promotes the effective use of modern day tools afforded to every other industry to improve the learning experience in K-12 public schools.

Digital Learning Day Live!

This year, Digital Learning Day is going live! Digital Learning Day Live! will highlight some of the nation’s most promising digital learning initiatives and foster a stimulating discussion about what it takes to integrate technology effectively, strategically, and meaningfully in schools. This free online event streams live from Washington, DC, beginning at 1PM ESTTo RSVP to this free, online event, visit the Digital Learning Day website.

Get involved!

It’s not too late to start celebrating Digital Learning Day! Check out some of these easy ways to get involved:

▪ Visit Digital Learning Day’s Planning Resources Hub to find free and easy to use tools to get started with your digital celebration.
▪ View the interactive activity map to gain ideas from other celebrants
▪ Spread the word about digital learning by visiting Digital Learning Day’s Facebook page, Twitter account (@OfficialDLDay), and by using the hashtag #DLDay.
▪ Join the virtual experience by participating in Digital Learning Day Live!


Visit Digital Learning Day’s official website to learn more, and keep reading to see how we’re celebrating digital learning today.
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Top Ten Things Everyone Should Know About K-12 Students’ Views on Digital Learning

Sneak peek at the 2014 National Findings for K-12 Students

We are excited to release a sneak peek of the 2014 National Findings for K-12 students in honor of Digital Learning Day! Last fall, 431,231 K-12 students nationwide spoke up about digital learning and more – here’s a preview of what we learned:

▪ 42% of 6th-8th graders say taking an online or virtual class should be a requirement for graduation.
▪ Amongst girls, 64% of 3rd-5th and 50% 6th-8th graders want to code.
▪ 46% of 9th-12th graders are Twitter users now – 4 times more than in 2011 when only 11% were tweeting.


To read the full list of things everyone should know about K-12 students’ views on digital learning, click here.
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Interactive District Participation Map

Check out our new interactive participant map, which shows how loudly all of our Speak Up 2014 districts spoke up about education, technology, and more.
Click here to view the map.
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Did your district participate in Speak Up 2014?

If so, we’ve provided a way for all district contacts to view a report of their district’s school results in a side by side comparison format. Follow these steps to view your data:

1. Visit the view data homepage and log in under option 1.
2. Once logged in, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on “Download Excel Summary.”
3. Select which audience you would like to view data under.
4. Download the spreadsheet.


Please note this information is only available to districts that participated in Speak Up 2014.
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Thank you for your interest and continued support of Speak Up! Be sure to stay updated on all things Speak Up by following us on FacebookTwitterInstagramand our Blog.
If you have any questions please feel free to contact our Speak Up Operations Manager, Jenny Hostert, at jhostert@tomorrow.org or via phone at (949) 609-4660 ext. 17.
Many thanks to our sponsors and partners for the support of Speak Up 2014: Blackboard Inc., BrainPOP, Fuel Education, DreamBox Learning, Schoolwires, Qualcomm Wireless Reach, Rosetta Stone, American Association of School Administrators, Consortium for School Networking, Digital Learning Day, Digital Promise, edWeb, International Association for K-12 Online Learning, International Society for Technology in Education, National Association of Secondary School Principals, National School Boards Association, Secondary Education Teachers’ Association, and the Southern Regional Education Board.

Digital Learning Day is in ONE day!

In honor of Digital Learning Day, Project Tomorrow will release a special sneak peek at the 2014 National Findings for K-12 students titled: Top Ten Things Everyone Should Know About K-12 Students’ Views on Digital Learning. Additionally all 2014 Speak Up district contacts will gain access to a new data report to help with data analysis! Check www.tomorrow.org/speakup or @SpeakUpEd on Twitter this Friday for more details! Happy Digital Learning Day!
To learn more about Digital Learning Day, visit the event’s website, and watch their informative video above. How are you celebrating Digital Learning Day? Share your plans on their interactive map and on Twitter by mentioning @OfficialDLDay and #DLDay.

Started in 2012, Digital Learning Day has provided a powerful venue for education leaders to highlight great teaching practice and showcase innovative teachers, leaders, and instructional technology programs that are improving student outcomes. This grassroots effort blossomed into a massive nationwide celebration as teachers realized that Digital Learning Day is not about technology, it’s about learning. It’s not about laying off teachers for laptops, it’s about enhancing the role of the teacher in America’s classrooms. Digital Learning Day promotes the effective use of modern day tools afforded to every other industry to improve the learning experience in K-12 public schools. To learn more, visit http://www.digitallearningday.org/domain/54.

Around the Web Wednesday

Happy Around the Web Wednesday! Browse all the links below for the latest news and topics trending in education and technology. Be sure to let us know which article intrigued you the most!

Mark your calendars – Digital Learning Day is this Friday, March 13th! Not sure what digital learning or Digital Learning Day are? Visit the event’s website for more information. How will you celebrate #DLDay? Let us know by commenting on this post or sharing your ideas on Twitter and Facebook.

Memo #5 from Mobile Learning Week 2015

Paris, France
February 27, 2015
The last day at this year’s Mobile Learning Week was a research seminar. The goal of the seminar was to bring together researchers as well as practitioners and policymakers to discuss the types of research that is available and needed around mobile learning, with an eye this year on women and girls.  With our longstanding interest and work in mobile learning research, I was excited participate in these discussions and to be part of the closing MLW2015 panel about the intersection of mobiles, women/girls and leadership.
At first glance, these three terms or concepts – mobile devices, women/girls’ empowerment, leadership – may seem to be an odd mix with little apparent commonality.  Each is a rich topic in their own right and in many circles, justifies their own dedicated conferences and research.  That is why this year’s Mobile Learning Week, as a collaboration between UNESCO and UN-Women, was such a fascinating idea and experience.  The big question is where do these three weighty concepts intersect and how can they be leveraged together to yield greater impact for all.  With the benefit of hindsight now, it is obvious that through the week’s keynotes, panel discussions, breakout sessions and workshops, the real goal of this year’s event was to uncover this unique intersection.  Not an easy task but one that I think was very successfully summarized in this closing panel.  I felt honored to be able to share my interpretation of this challenge (and potential solutions) as a panel participant.  Here is a short synopsis of some of the remarks I shared on this panel.
As we learn from the annual Speak Up data, while girls and boys have similar perceptions on the value of digital tools and resources, including mobile devices, on their learning, the way they want to use technology can be very different. Girls are particularly interested in using mobiles to connect, create and collaborate with others.  Underlying these activities is a deep felt passion to share ideas and to have a voice in local as well as wider range issues that affect their lives. After spending the week with conference representatives from all over the globe, I have a new appreciation for the immense power of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets to enable girls and women to have a voice, a voice that in many parts of the world is not socially or culturally the norm.  In that sense, the impact of mobile devices on women and girls is indeed a new sense of empowerment.  And while we don’t often think about that in the United States, I think the impact can be similar in many circumstances.  Beyond sharing ideas, we also learn from Speak Up that girls like the idea of using their mobile devices to create and share various forms of content.  This type of content creation can be to develop skills or to gain feedback from others on their work. Earlier in the week, I learned about an interesting Silicon Valley nonprofit called Technovation (http://www.technovationchallenge.org/home/) that provides a program and competition for girls around mobile app development to solve local problems. This type of activity brings together the idea of skill development with content creation in a way that has high relevancy for girls.  Again more empowerment at play!

 

When I think about the types of skills that girls are acquiring through their use of mobile devices and mobile-enabled content, the concept of developing a next great generation of women leaders comes clearer into focus. When I talk with corporate and university leaders about the types of skills that today’s youth need to acquire to be successful in the new economy and society, the refrain is amazing consistent.  The skills that have the highest value include communications, collaboration, creativity, critical thinking and computation thinking.  These are also the same skills that leadership gurus say are essential for leadership in a global, information-intensive era.  As noted earlier, the girls themselves articulate the relationships between their use of mobile devices and the development of these types of skills. Given the need for the development of new skills, and a new attitude about the potential of women and girls to be full participants in leadership roles in work and society, the responsibility of mobile devices in supporting these twin goals cannot be ignored.  It simply makes common sense now.  So, as we close out this year’s Mobile Learning Week, our new discussions post-2015 should be not about if access to mobile devices is important for women and girls, but rather, what we need to do to position these tools to enable and empower new capabilities and opportunities for all.  I look forward to continuing this discussion throughout the year and leveraging what I have learned at this year’s Mobile Learning Week to inform our work at Project Tomorrow.

Your Speak Up data is in!

We are excited to release the Speak Up 2014 data results to all participating organizations! If your school or district participated in Speak Up between October and December of last year, it’s time to dig in and see what your students, teachers, parents and community members had to say. Keep reading to learn how to access your data and more.

Quick links:

▪ Your survey results are now available! Learn how to access your Speak Up data results.
▪ Exporting your data is easy: Simply print the results or copy and paste them into one of our templates.
▪ Need help with your Speak Up data? Learn more about our Speak Up services.
▪ Speak Up on the go! Learn more about upcoming presentations with our CEO, Julie Evans. 

For more than a decade, Speak Up has been providing this service to schools and districts around the country. We’re excited to see how this data informs your initiatives, policies and practices. Drop us a note and let us know how you use the data this year or how we can make the surveys even more useful next year. We love hearing from you! Feel free to share your thoughts with us on Facebook,Twitter, and our Blog.

-The Project Tomorrow team

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Access your Speak Up results online

All schools and districts around the country who registered for Speak up 2014 can now access their data for free – here’s how:

1. Click here to access your reports.
2. Select either Option 1 to view District results or Option 2 to view individual School results.
3. Next, enter the state, the first few letters of your district or school name and your admin password.
4. To view data reports, select the number in the “# of District Surveys” column to display that survey type.
5. To view your open ended text responses, click on “District ” in the Open Ended Responses Column.
6. Print the results or copy and paste them into your own file or this Speak Up Data Excel Template. To view your data across audiences and by theme, use ourthematic report template to drop in your school or district’s data.

*Please note, at least one survey must be present to display the survey results with state and national comparisons.

Exporting your Speak Up data

Exporting your Speak Up data is quick and easy! Just follow these steps:

1. Highlight and copy the Speak Up data by survey type from our Speak Up data homepage.
2. Paste your data into our template Excel spreadsheet (click here to download) – the survey types are already organized by tab.
3. The file is already formatted to print, making it easy to view your data!

Click here to learn more about accessing your data, or watch our quick how-to video here.
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Need help?

The Project Tomorrow staff is available to help you effectively use your data, here are just a few of the services we can provide you:
▪ Identify the top 5 trends in your school, district or state with national benchmarks
▪ Create a Speak Up presentation that you can use to share your Speak Up results in your school or district
▪ Provide Speak Up fast facts that can be used on your website, newsletters or promotional material
▪ Present your Speak Up data in person or via a webinar
▪ Prepare a summary of your specific Speak Up findings (school, district or state) that can be distributed to your stakeholders
▪ Write a case statement, using the Speak Up data, highlighting the benefits of investing in technology (school, district, state or national)
▪ Prepare a customized narrative report about your Speak Up data (school, district or state)
Contact the Speak Up Team, to learn more about our consulting services and fees.
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Speak Up On the Go!

Upcoming presentations

The Current Pulse on Ed Tech
NASSP Conference
San Diego, CA
Friday, February 20th
Workshop: Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Gender-Sensitive Mobile Learning Projects in Educational Settings
UNESCO’s Mobile Learning Week
Paris, France
Monday, February 23rd

Your Speak Up 2014 data is now available! Learn how to access your data here:

Your data is in! If your school or district participated in Speak Up between October and December of last year, it’s time to dig in and see what your students, teachers, parents and community members had to say. You get all of the qualitative data as well as the responses to this year’s open-ended questions.
You can also access the results for your state and the overall national findings – so you can see how your community compares.
You’ll need your login and password to access your data. If you don’t have it, go to our website to retrieve your password.

All schools and districts around the country who registered for Speak up 2014 can now access their data for free. Here’s how.
1.) Click hereto access your reports.
2) Select either Option 1 to view District results or Option 2 to view individual School results.
3.) Next, enter the state, the first few letters of your district or school name and your admin password.
4.) To view data reports, select the number in the “# of District (School) Surveys” column to display that survey type.
5.) To view your open ended text responses, click on “District (School)” in the Open Ended Responses Column.
6.) Print the results or copy and paste them into your own file or this Speak Up Data Excel Template. To view your data across audiences and by theme, use our thematic report template to drop in your school or district’s data.
*Please note, at least one survey must be present to display the survey results with state and national comparisons.
For more than a decade, Speak Up has been providing this service to schools and districts around the country. We’re excited to see how this data informs your initiatives, policies and practices. Drop us a note and let us know how you use the data this year or how we can make the surveys even more useful next year. We love hearing from you!

Click here to access your data

What Texans Said about Technology and Learning

The 2014 Speak Up data is in! As part of our time at this year’s TCEA Convention, we decided to take a look at what students, parents and educators in the Texas had to say about technology and learning during this year’s surveys. More than 83,000 Texans weighed in – more participation than from any other state!
Texas parents expressed strong concern about their children’s futures and whether or not they think their children’s schools are helping to prepare them for careers:
  • Like parents nationwide, Texas parents have three primary concerns about their child’s future:
    • My child is not learning the right skills in school to be successful in the future (57%)
    • My child is going to need more than a college degree to get a good job (47%)
    • My child is going to have to compete with better educated workers around the globe (45%)
  • Texas parents were also asked about the best ways for their child to acquire the “right skills” for future careers. Their top responses should be very interesting for both education and community leaders:
    • Use technology in classes at school (75%)
    • Get real world job experience through summer or part time jobs or internships (75%)
    • Participate in school leadership activities (66%)
    • Learn an additional language (64%)
    • Participate in sports teams or academic groups (61%)
Texas parents also appear to be leading the nation in terms of their desire for more use of technology to connect with their child’s teachers and school.  
  • 37% of Texas parents say that they would like to use a school or class mobile app for better school-to-home communications (vs. 30% of parents nationwide).
  • 60% of Texas parents would like their child’s teacher to send text messages to their mobile device about class or school news (vs. 48% of parents nationwide).
  • However, only 27% of Texas teachers say they are currently using text messaging to communicate with their students’ parents.
In our review of the data, we noted some interesting “disconnects” between the various groups when it came to access to mobile devices:
  • While 75% of Texas students in grades 6-12 and 86% of school principals say it is important for every student to have access to a mobile device (laptop, tablet or Chromebook) in class to support schoolwork, 53% of Texas teachers say that their students do not have regular access to mobile devices to use in their classrooms.
  • Note: 57% of Texas high school students and 66% of Texas middle school students say that the use of technology in school increases their engagement and interest in the learning process.
We asked about the state of online and virtual classes and found not only a disconnect, but a lack of preparedness by school districts for this mode of learning:
  • More than half of Texas school principals (56%) and parents (52%) think students should be required to take a fully online or virtual class as a high school graduation requirement, but only 34% of high school students agree.
  • Much more work is necessary before such requirements can be implemented. Per Texas school principals, 74% say they are not offering any fully online or virtual classes for their students currently.
  • Of those that are offering this type of learning experience, it is limited to the core subjects of English, math, science and social studies. Only 10% of Texas principals say they are offering online classes in world languages even though 25% of high school students say they would like to learn another language online.
  • Note: Parents’ appreciation for online learning may be based upon their own personal experiences; 51% of Texas parents say they have taken an online class for their own work-related professional development.
Students, parents, teachers and administrators in Texas have different views on the value of various digital tools and resources to support learning. When asked to identify the digital tools that should be included in an “ultimate school” for today’s learners, the Speak Up responses demonstrate that the different stakeholder groups do not yet share a common value proposition on many popular technology initiatives.
Digital Tools for Ultimate School
TX Gr 6-8 students
Parents
Teachers
Principals
Internet access campus wide
78%
55%
76%
79%
Students use their own mobile devices at school for learning
71%
45%
45%
52%
Mobile apps for education
67%
61%
49%
62%
Digital content
65%
63%
56%
63%
Educational digital games
64%
24%
47%
49%
Online textbooks
60%
64%
50%
63%
As the national interest in the need to prepare students for STEM continues, we have asked about student interest in science, technology, engineering and math fields for years:
  • Aligning with national Speak Up data, 27% of Texas middle school students (Grades 6-8) say they are very interested in a STEM career field. But equally significant is the 36% who say that they are somewhat interested.  Supporting the idea that coding can be a meaningful way to increase student interest in STEM, 57% of Texas middle school students say they would be interested in taking an in-school or after-school class on how to learn to code.
Across Texas, 83,881 total surveys were submitted; 40 Districts submitted at least 10 surveys; 362 schools submitted at least 10 surveys. Break down of participants: 70,090 K-12 Students, 7,939 Teachers & Librarians, 3,813 Parents (in English & Spanish), 783 School/District Administrators, 1,256 Community Members.
 
All schools and districts around the country who registered for Speak up 2014 can access their data beginning tomorrow (2/4/15) for free at
Learn more about the Speak Up Research Project

How does your school/district plan on using your Speak Up data?

With the Speak Up 2014 survey data release this Wednesday, February 4th, now is the perfect time to start thinking about how your school/district can use your data. We asked last year’s top participating schools and districts how they used their data – check them out below for ideas on how you can use yours:

“Through the years I have used Speak Up data to help prepare the District’s strategic plan, to plan professional development, and to help shape a shared vision of how technology and core curriculum should be delivered. Survey results have been referenced when planning the district’s budget and prioritizing technology infrastructure and instructional technology investments. Speak Up data has been used to help craft and secure competitive grants and it has led to the consideration and creation of new courses.”
—Paul Caputo, Southern Columbia Area School District (PA)

“Responses from the survey are used as evidence and documentation to support district technology initiatives. Each year, the responses are reviewed by the district’s Technology Advisory Committee and shared with district and building administrators to determine areas of focus for future planning. Additionally, the district incorporates Speak Up data into the Educational Technology Plan.”
—Dr. Kristy Sailors, Blue Valley School District (KS)

“[By using our Speak Up data] we targeted specific questions and asked each school to address those needs in their school teach plans.  We pulled out specific responses on a few specific questions for our district accreditation.”
—Lauren Woolley, Shelby County (AL)

“Speak Up data has helped garner support for 1 to 1 initiatives, increased professional development and changes in instructional best practices and expectations.”
—Rod Carnill, Frederick County Public Schools (VA)

Click here to read more testimonials from past participants, and click here to learn more about the data release.

How does your school/district plan on using your Speak Up data? Let us know by commenting on this post, tweeting us (@SpeakUpEd or @ProjectTomorrow), or posting on our Facebook page.

Save the date – Speak Up 2014 data will be released on February 4th

With the Speak Up 2014 data release date approaching, now is the perfect time to learn how to view your Speak Up data before it’s released on February 4th! Visit our Speak Up Data page in order to sign up to receive a reminder when your data is available, learn how to receive your data, retrieve your password, or look up your organization’s primary contact. Click on the image above or visit our website in order to learn more.

Speak Up News, January 2015

Happy New Year! We hope you all had a wonderful holiday season. This past survey period brought in record-breaking numbers, with a total of 521,861 surveys taken by 431,238 students, 44,299 teachers, 4,326 administrators, 35,342 parents, and 6,656 members of the community! Although Speak Up 2014 is over, we still have exciting news and events to look out for. Keep reading to learn more!
In this newsletter, you will find information regarding…

▪ Speak Up 2014 data release: Your survey results are in and will be released on February 4th!
▪ Speak Up America winners: We are thrilled to announce the Speak Up America winners of classroom grants, conference registrations, and more!
▪ Making Learning Mobile: The results from our two-year-long study on mobile learning with Kajeet are in!
▪ Speak Up on the go! Learn more about upcoming presentations with our CEO, Julie Evans. 

Happy reading! Feel free to share your thoughts with us on FacebookTwitter, and our Blog.

-The Project Tomorrow team

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Speak Up 2014

Data will be released on February 4th!

Thank you to the 431,238 students, 44,299 teachers, 4,326 administrators, 35,342 parents, and 6,656 members of the community who participated in Speak Up 2014. We are thrilled to release the survey data on February 4th! Be on the lookout for more information closer to the release date. In the meantime, check out the preliminary data we pulled during Speak Up America week:

Preliminary data

Last month we pulled special snapshots of preliminary data for students, parents, teachers, librarians and principals. Each day during Speak Up America Week we released a special video infographic on new Speak Up findings. Check out each snapshot below:
▪ Teachers
▪ Parents
▪ Students
▪ Librarians
▪ Principals
Click here to view all the snapshots.
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Speak Up America

Last month, over 85,000 students, parents, educators, administrators, and community members participated in Speak Up America 2014! In its second year, Speak Up America celebrated past and present participants with opportunities to win classroom grants, free conference registrations, and more. We are thrilled to announce the winners below:
Onslow 2
Southwood Elementary
Newington Schools

Photo and video challenge winners

Speak Up for America Photo Challenge Winners

▪ Hunters Creek Middle School from Onslow County, NC
▪ Southwood Elementary School from MSD of Wabash County, IN
▪ Martin Kellogg Middle School from Newington Public Schools, CT


Speak Up for America Video Challenge Winners

▪ Saint John XXIII Catholic School from Scottsdale, AZ
▪ Escola Antoni Gaudi from Barcelona, Spain

Conference registration winners

ISTE 2015 Conference and Expo

  • Shelby County School District, AL
  • Wake County Public School System, NC
TCEA 2015 Conference & Exposition

  • Mission Consolidated Independent School District, TX
CUE 2015 Annual Conference

  • Clark County Schools, NV 
  • Anaheim City School District, CA
NETA 2015 Spring Conference

  • Mullen Public Schools, NE
NCCE 2015 Conference

  • Lakeside High School from Nine Mile Falls School District, WA
BbWorld 2015

  • Klein ISD, TX
2015 iNACOL Blended and Online Learning Symposium

  • Albemarle County Public Schools, VA

BrainPOP classroom certificate winners

▪ Bradie M Shrum Elementary from Salem Community Schools, IN
▪ Magma Ranch K-8 School from Florence Unified School District, AZ


Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to everyone who participated in Speak Up America! Learn more about the week long event here.
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Making Learning Mobile

The Making Learning Mobile 2.0 study, sponsored by Kajeet with funding fromQualcomm’s Wireless Reach Initiative and Project Tomorrow, takes an in-depth look at the impact of 1-to-1 tablet implementation, including Internet access outside the classroom, with students from Chicago Public Schools. For the past two years, Project Tomorrow has worked with Kajeet to assess the impact of mobile devices on teaching and learning, and the results are in!

Results from the Making Learning Mobile study

▪ The school-issued tablet increased at-home Internet access for this cohort of students by 53%. This is especially significant given the persistence of the digital divide in home Internet access within our communities.
▪ The teachers felt more comfortable and assigned more reading and writing homework because the students had home Internet access. This resulted in increased reading and writing fluency, which is especially important for English Language Learners.
▪ 60% of the students agreed their reading increased because of their personal access to the tablet and the Internet; 60% noted they did more writing this school year than in previous years and that the tablet helped them improve their writing skills.

Interested in learning more? Download the report, and don’t miss our webinar with Kajeet on Wednesday, February 18th at 4pm EST – click here to register.
Kajeet
QC
PT
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Speak Up On the Go!

Upcoming presentations

8 Essentials for Mobile Learning
District leadership workshop
San Marcos, CA
Friday, January 23rd
Sneak Peek at Speak Up 2014 Findings
Marketing Boot Camp at TCEA
Austin, TX
Tuesday, February 3rd
The Current Pulse on Ed Tech
NASSP Conference
San Diego, CA
Friday, February 20th
Workshop: Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Gender-Sensitive Mobile Learning Projects in Educational Settings
UNESCO’s Mobile Learning Week
Paris, France
Monday, February 23rd
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Thank you for your interest and continued support of Speak Up! Be sure to stay updated on all things Speak Up by following us on FacebookTwitterInstagramand our Blog.
If you have any questions please feel free to contact our Speak Up Operations Manager, Jenny Hostert, at jhostert@tomorrow.org or via phone at 949/609-4660 ext. 17.
Many thanks to our sponsors and partners for the support of Speak Up 2014: Blackboard Inc., BrainPOP, Fuel Education, DreamBox Learning, Schoolwires, Qualcomm Wireless Reach, Rosetta Stone, American Association of School Administrators, Consortium for School Networking, Digital Learning Day, Digital Promise, edWeb, International Association for K-12 Online Learning, International Society for Technology in Education, National Association of Secondary School Principals, National School Boards Association, Secondary Education Teachers’ Association, and the Southern Regional Education Board.
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