Tag Archives: YouthTEACH2Learn

Throwback Thursday

Happy Throwback Thursday! Each Throwback Thursday will feature past Project Tomorrow news, events, data reports, and more. This week we’re focusing on our YouthTEACH2Learn program, with a testimonial from past participant Shelly Becerra, class of 2011 from Trabuco Hills High School. Check out her experience below:

YouthTEACH2Learn was an exciting and unique opportunity for me. Throughout high school I was consistently split between teaching and computer engineering as my preferred career choices. I had always loved kids, but also math and technology. My sophomore year I took Honors physics with Mrs. Fliegler, one of the YouthTEACH2Learn teachers at Trabuco. She always talked about how fun and exciting the class was. My junior year I took Honors Chemistry with Mr. Camilling, the other YouthTEACH2Learn teacher at our school. He also expressed his love of the class. My senior year I finally enrolled in YouthTEACH2Learn. I had an amazing experience. Our school team, Melinda Heights, was so great. Our kids were awesome, and really enjoyed us teaching them.

There are a few key moments really stand out in my mind. One was the fire alarm. Right in the middle of one of our lessons, the fire alarm went off. It was a little stressful trying to figure out what to do, but in the end we thought everything through and finished teaching our lesson. The next experience I will always remember was a time when a cute little girl, Regan gave us a thank you note. It was extremely touching. The final moment that stands out was our last lesson. We were saying good-bye to Mrs. Cline’s class, walking them out to recess, when one by one, the elementary kids came up and hugged us all. It was so unexpected, but amazing! Our team left that day a little sad, but happy that we touched those kids’ lives like that.

I can remember learning from high school students in the YouthTEACH2Learn program when I was little, and after being in the program, I truly understand how great the class is. This program was the key factor in my choosing teaching as my career path. I am beginning school at Cal State Fullerton as a Math major, in hopes of becoming a high school math teacher.

The YouthTEACH2Learn program is a career exploration program where students explore teaching as a career. During the course, the students gain practical experience by observing elementary school classrooms, learning how to teach, developing and teaching standards-based lessons to younger students in neighboring elementary schools and participating in local community service projects. In addition, students also have the opportunity to meet local educators, attend career panels and visit local college campuses in order to determine if the teaching is a “good-fit” for their professional goals.

Interested in YouthTEACH2Learn? Click here to see it in action, and click here to learn more about the program. 

The Shortage of Substitute Teachers

The state of Minnesota is facing a struggle that several other states know well- a shortage of substitute teachers.

School districts in Rochester, Minnesota report difficulties finding substitute teachers, with principals and superintendents having to cover the vacancies. Full-time teachers also report filling in for other teachers, which cuts into their preparation time. In an interview with the Post-Bulletin, Kingland High School principal Jim Hecimovich said he has had to fill in for sick teachers regularly.

Some education leaders say the substitution teacher shortage is caused by a good job market; “The job market has become so good in the Rochester area, people are not relying on substitute teaching but are finding different careers,” said Byron Public Schools Superintendent Jeff Elstad. However, other education leaders blame the shortage on a larger problem – there are simply fewer people in teaching. Dover-Eyota superintendent Bruce Klaehn said he noticed a decline in the number of job applicants for teaching positions.

Two of Project Tomorrow’s initiatives, YouthTEACH2Learn and the California Future Educators Association (F.E.A.), work to combat this issue.

YouthTEACH2Learn is a career exploration program where students explore teaching as a career. During the course, the students gain practical experience by observing elementary school classrooms, learning how to teach, developing and teaching standards-based lessons to younger students in neighboring elementary schools and participating in local community service projects. In addition, students also have the opportunity to meet local educators, attend career panels and visit local college campuses in order to determine if the teaching is a “good-fit” for their professional goals. To learn more about YouthTEACH2Learn, visit http://www.tomorrow.org/programs/yt2l.html.

California F.E.A. encourages students to learn about careers in education and aid them in exploring teaching while providing meaningful opportunities to receive the mentoring and support they need to actualize their career aspirations. To learn more about California F.E.A., visit http://www.tomorrow.org/fea/.

Interested in reading the original article? Click here to read “Area districts desperate for substitute teachers” by the Post-Bulletin.

The Teach Campaign: Recruiting New Teachers Who will be able to Make a Difference in Not Only Their Students’ Lives But also in the Profession Itself

“If you can’t do, teach” is just one of several negative sentiments towards teaching that has made education an undesirable profession. However, with the predicted one million teachers that are set to retire in the next four to six years, the profession needs as many bright and eager new educators as it can get. In order to deal with this change the Department of Education created Teach, a campaign that hopes to combat negative sentiments and attract high-achieving college graduates.
Under the slogan “Make More. Teach,” the campaign uses videos and radio announcements to portray teaching as meaningful and captivating as more popular careers, such as medicine and law. “The challenge is to change the conversation around teaching so that it becomes the career that you want your child to go into rather than the career that you counsel children out of,” explains Kathy Payne, the senior director of education leadership at State Farm.
One of the negative sentiments towards teaching is that there are not enough job openings for hopeful teachers. With the upcoming retirement of the baby boomers, there is now “an amazing chance to make a difference for decades to come,” says Arne Duncan, secretary of education. Through financial support from sponsors, Teach is able to hire recruiters to visit college campuses in order to speak to undergraduate students about a future career in teaching. The campaign also deals with the battles within the public education system concerning the use of standardized testing in teacher performance evaluations and the rollout of the new Common Core standards. “If you find different ways to communicate with and teach kids, where it’s not just that same old thing…that’s what’s going to get those test scores raised,” says Cliff Skeet, group creative director at McGarryBowen, the advertising agency that developed the videos and ads used by the campaign.

 

The Teach campaign aims to recruit top students into the teaching field, making the profession as competitive and invigorating as medicine, law, and engineering. “Teachers today are breaking down obstacles,” says former teacher Taylor Mali. “[They are] finding innovative ways to instill old lessons, proving that greatness can be found in everyday places.” Through the campaign, the Department of Education hopes to recruit new teachers who will be able to make a difference in not only their students’ lives but also in the profession itself.

Here at Project Tomorrow, our mission is to ensure that today’s students are well prepared to be tomorrow’s innovators, leaders and engaged citzens of the world. Through our YouthTEACH2Learn program and the Future Educators Association of California we are working towards preparing the next great generation of teachers.
The YouthTEACH2Learn program is a career exploration program where students explore teaching as a career. During the course, the students gain practical experience by observing elementary school classrooms, learning how to teach, developing and teaching standards-based lessons to younger students in neighboring elementary schools and participating in local community service projects. To learn more about YouthTEACH2Learn log onto http://www.tomorrow.org/programs/yt2l.html.
The Future Educators Association of California, an initiative of Project Tomorrow, was established in order to “attract, equip and provide experiences for students who are exploring teaching as a future career; to develop essential skills that will lead to highly trained and qualified teachers.” Now, more than ever, we must invest & support our future educators in order to plan for a bright tomorrow. To learn more about F.E.A California, log onto http://www.tomorrow.org/fea/.
Read the article: Campaign Seeks to Recruit Top Students to Become Teachers in the New York Times here, and be sure to let us know what you think!
Have a great week.

-The Project Tomorrow team

Written by Lisa Chu, Project Tomorrow Fall Intern

Getting to Know the Project Tomorrow Team

Happy Friday!

We hope you all had a fantastic week! It’s Friday which means it’s time to meet another one of our fabulous team members. Today we would like to introduce you to Meredith Kohl, our Special Projects Manager!

Meredith Kohl
Special Projects Manager
Project Tomorrow
949-609-4660 x20 voice
Meredith Kohl serves as Special Projects Manager for Project Tomorrow®.  Her present work focuses on the organization’s Tomorrow’s Teacher Initiative, which stimulates and nurtures the development of a new generation of K-12 teachers in math and science by leveraging Project Tomorrow’s YouthTEACH2Learn and California Future Educators Association (CFEA) programs across the state.  Meredith joined the Project Tomorrow® team in 2012 as the Youth Leadership Summit Coordinator. Her previous experience includes serving as a corps member with Teach for America in the Las Vegas Valley and a Fulbright Fellow to Italy, along with administrative and programmatic nonprofit work at the Center for Teaching Quality in North Carolina. She holds a California elementary teaching certification as well as a master of education in curriculum and instruction, and currently teaches and directs the lower elementary education program at Bridges Reading and Writing Institute in Irvine.

In her free time, Meredith enjoys anything Italian, playing soccer, crafting and design projects, and Saturday morning brunch excursions with her husband—we’re always looking for tasty spots in Orange County. Recommendations welcome and greatly appreciated. 😉

Please be sure to check back next week to meet Marianne Miller, Grants Manager!
Thanks for reading!

-The Project Tomorrow Team